Search Results: "Carolyn MacCullough"


BOOK REVIEW

ALWAYS A WITCH by Carolyn MacCullough
FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"Readers unfamiliar with the first book should check it out before they tackle this one; that background under their belt, this proves to be an enjoyable magical adventure. (Urban fantasy. 12 & up)"
How does one go about saving one's family from history? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALLING THROUGH DARKNESS by Carolyn MacCullough
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"No false cheer at the end, but a sliver of hopefulness as Ginny begins to gain clarity and decides to tell her father the complicated truth. (Fiction. YA)"
This emotional page-turner uses present tense to create a sense of immediacy—and to mirror 17-year-old Ginny's frame of mind as she refuses to think about the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONCE A WITCH by Carolyn MacCullough
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 14, 2009

"Characters, setting, conflict—all develop nicely to create a light urban fantasy that goes down easy and will have readers asking for its sequel. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Growing up Talentless in a family of witches has been hard on Tamsin, particularly since her older, perfect sister Rowena oozes Talent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEALING HENRY by Carolyn MacCullough
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2005

"Plainspoken, lyrical and sad. (Fiction. YA)"
"The night Savannah brains her stepfather with the frying pan is the night she decides to leave home for good," begins this finely crafted fiction about running away in desperation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRAWING THE OCEAN by Carolyn MacCullough
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"MacCullough's subtle use of present tense and visually evocative writing create an eloquent portrait. (Fiction. YA)"
In lyrical, sweetly unhurried prose, MacCullough paints Sadie, a 16-year-old artist newly transplanted to the east coast from California. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A TWISTED TALE by Carolyn Fisher
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2001

"Readers who find Causley's 'Quack,' Said the Billy Goat (1986), or Most's Cow That Went Oink (1990) a trifle sedate won't have that problem with this unrestrained solo debut. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Fisher punches up a well-worn plot with vivid language and swirling modernist art that incorporates an equally wild hand-lettered text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANASTASIA AND HER SISTERS by Carolyn Meyer
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 7, 2015

"A richly detailed introduction to the tragedy of the last royal family of Russia. (Historical fiction. 13-17)"
Anastasia and her siblings may be kept in ignorance about most of the tragedy and upheaval affecting Russia in the early 20th century, but that doesn't stop them from worrying about the world beyond their daily lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIARY OF A WAITRESS by Carolyn Meyer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 7, 2015

"A slowly paced and occasionally even tedious depiction of a small slice of American railroad history. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Although more than a year too young for the position, almost-17-year-old Kitty takes a job as a Harvey Girl, one of the well-trained waitresses that staffed a national restaurant chain serving rail passengers from the late-19th to mid-20th centuries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLEOPATRA CONFESSES by Carolyn Meyer
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 7, 2011

"Readers who hungry purely for lots of effective detail of an ancient culture, time and place may find this a digestible-enough vehicle for it, with oodles of backmatter for support. (Historical fiction. 11-14)"
Having made her way through the European princesses of note (Duchessina, 2007, etc.), Meyer dishes up historical-fiction-lite in this imagined account of Cleopatra's coming of age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: June 1, 2008

"Though her tale of woe becomes somewhat repetitious, she's sympathetic and understandable, and readers of this illuminating chronicle will be both fascinated and appalled by how restricted her life was. (Historical fiction. 12 & up)"
In the afterword of her haunting story about the life and times of Mozart's older sister Maria Anna—Nannerl—Meyer says that she was intrigued by the question, "What must it have been like to be the highly talented sister of a genius?"Although Nannerl, a gifted child performer with a passion for music, was outclassed by her brother, much of her frustration was the result of being a woman in a time when a musical career was not an option. Read full book review >