Search Results: "Carrie Eko-Burgess"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CONSTRUCTION CREW by Lynn Meltzer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 8, 2011

"Bulldoze a spot on the shelf for this one. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A rollicking, rhyming salute to a construction crew and the equipment they use to demolish an old building and construct a family home in its stead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARRIE by Stephen King
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 8, 1974

"But as they still say around here, 'Sit a spell and collect yourself.'"
Figuratively and literally shattering moments of hoRRRRRipilication in Chamberlain, Maine where stones fly from the sky rather than from the hands of the villagers (as they did in "The Lottery," although the latter are equal to other forms of persecution). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANTHONY BURGESS by Roger Lewis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 19, 2004

"Trenchant and dogged, expunging the biographer of a 20-year anxiety of influence."
Loquacious portraitist Lewis (The Real Life of Laurence Olivier, 1997, etc.) leaves no stone unturned in his obsessive and hardly sympathetic life of the tortured author of A Clockwork Orange. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SISTER CARRIE by Lauren Fairbanks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 7, 1993

"Pretentious nonsense."
Like Kathy Acker, first-novelist Fairbanks finds inspiration for her barely readable word collage in the works of Joyce, Beckett, and Burroughs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CARRIE DIARIES by Candace Bushnell
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2010

"Yes, the sex, drugs and drinking will titillate, but Carrie's sharp observations of her peers and human relationships give the book smart, sassy intellectual power. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Before she made a name for herself as a New York City sex columnist, Carrie Bradshaw lived in a small Connecticut town and navigated the perils of high school, the events of which she narrates here in the present tense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BURGESS BOYS by Elizabeth Strout
Released: March 26, 2013

"A skilled but lackluster novel that dutifully ticks off the boxes of family strife, infidelity and ripped-from-the-headlines issues."
Two squabbling brothers confront their demons, their crumbling love lives and a hate crime case that thrusts them back to their Maine roots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARRIE AND ME by Carol Burnett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 9, 2013

"A mediocre book, but it's not difficult to understand why Burnett wrote it. Instead of buying it, rent Tokyo Pop, a 1988 cult classic starring a young, radiant Hamilton."
Comedian Burnett (This Time Together, 2010, etc.) limns her relationship with her eldest daughter, Carrie Hamilton, who died of cancer at age 38. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EARTH GIANT by Melvin Burgess
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

"The giant, in her silent relationship with Amy, is a marvelous creation, and the story rockets to its exciting conclusion with a gleaming sense of otherworldliness. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A wonderfully cinematic adventure about a small girl and the giant she discovers under a tree, and the reuniting of that giant—only a child herself—with her parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN ANGEL FOR MAY by Melvin Burgess
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 1995

"Thoroughly satisfying. (Fiction/fantasy. 10-14)"
A well-crafted time-travel novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 31, 1986

"Forgive him his obtuse remarks."
This collection of nearly 200 short reviews and literary pieces—probably necessarily uneven in quality given the publish-in-haste nature of his book reviewing—demonstrates Burgess' broad learning and also his habitual critical highhandedness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 21, 1983

"This book is very deep'), considerably less than meets the eye."
Here you have three fascinating stories bound together. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MF by Anthony Burgess
Released: March 1, 1971

"Burgess does something comparable for his claque and other readers with Olympian patience."
The title initials stand first for the hero, Miles Faber, peculiarly orphaned and at twenty ripe for some rite of passage or other. Read full book review >