Search Results: "Catherine Cerveny"


BOOK REVIEW

THE RULE OF LUCK by Catherine  Cerveny
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 7, 2017

"A well-crafted world with a promising heroine, but hopefully the sequels will spend less time describing the love interest's blue eyes."
In the year 2950, Romani tarot card reader Felicia Sevigny discovers she's at the heart of a sinister plot to manipulate human genetics in Cerveny's debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 9, 2006

"An entertaining survey of highly unusual happenings that situate humans rather low on nature's food chain."
Boggling stories of crazy weather, from ice fogs and black blizzards to whirlwinds of fire, accompanied by explanations of the whys and wherefores. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CATHERINE LACEY
by Vincent Scarpa

Ask Catherine Lacey for the origin story of her new novel, The Answers, and she won’t hesitate to give you the short answer: back pain. More specifically, an inexplicable and persistent back pain that greeted her in the midst of an emotionally turbulent period in her life marked by loss, upheaval, and complication; a time which occasioned, for Lacey, a ...


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BOOK REVIEW

SOLOMON CROCODILE by Catherine Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 20, 2011

"Light and entertaining fun. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Solomon Crocodile annoys and irritates the other creatures in the swamp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SPREE IN PAREE by Catherine Stock
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2004

"Mais oui. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Anyone for a quick day trip to Paris? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEYMOUR BLEU by Catherine  Deeter
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"An edifying portrait of one of the ways an artist works. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Deeter (who illustrated Alice Walker's Finding the Green Stone, 1991, etc.) guides readers through an exploration of the artistic process. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE ARE YOU GOING, MANYONI? by Catherine Stock
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Pronouncing glossary. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Manyoni is on her way to school; she gets up at dawn to walk two hours across the plain, along the Limpopo riverbed, through ``the shady kloof where the shy impala feed,'' ``past the red sandstone koppies,'' ``over the krantz above Tobwani Dam,'' and on to the tidy village with its brick school, where there's still time to play with her friends before class. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BANANA SPLIT FROM OUTER SPACE by Catherine Siracusa
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Text and humorous illustrations share space equally, making this the perfect next-step for those who have soloed on I Can Reads and other easy readers. (Fiction. 6-8)"
An easy illustrated novel in the Chapters series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLIP, CLOP by Catherine Hnatov
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 15, 2016

"A pleasant-enough variation on the perennially popular animal-noise genre. (Board book. 6 mos.-2)"
A series of farm animals strut, wander, ramble, trot, and scamper across the pages of this simple board book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABIGAIL by Catherine Rayner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A richly illustrated story that could benefit from better page design and crisper storytelling. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Gorgeous, lush illustrations strengthen a somewhat loosely connected story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAR WHO SHARED by Catherine Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2011

"Simple and sublime. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Three forest animals square off over a juicy piece of fruit but avert conflict. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAND, SEA, AND SKY by Catherine Paladino
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1993

"A celebration indeed. (Poetry/Picture book. 5-10)"
Framed between Aileen Fisher's ``Looking Around'' (``Bees/own the clover,/birds/own the sky...'') and Felice Holman's ``Who Am I?'' (``The trees ask me,/And the sky...''), 17 more poems, grouped as the title suggests and all of good quality (though Dickinson's ``I'll tell you how the sun rose'' easily outshines the rest). Read full book review >