Search Results: "Charles C. Alexander"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"A useful, informative presentation. (38 photos, not seen)"
Baseball historian and biographer Alexander (Rogers Hornsby, 1995, etc.) takes a breathless tour through the national pastime as it adapted to the harsh economy of the Great Depression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 5, 1991

"The box score: an evenhanded audit of an enduring socioeconomic institution, which, for all its unsparing detail, should delight fans of any era."
An agreeably informal narrative history of organized baseball from a veteran annalist who knows how to work the corners. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROGERS HORNSBY by Charles C. Alexander
NON-FICTION
Released: July 27, 1995

"Alexander conveys an impressive wealth of facts, though his narrative seldom jumps off the page; nor does he satisfactorily explain how the game changed during Hornsby's career. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A thorough yet static portrait of one of the most accomplished players of baseball's ``golden age.'' ``I have never been a yes man,'' declared Rogers Hornsby in a 1950 interview, and this statement sums up his character. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPOKE by Charles C. Alexander
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 31, 2007

"A comprehensive biography of one of the more accomplished, if unexciting, players in major-league history."
From baseball historian Alexander (Breaking the Slump: Baseball in the Depression Era, 2001, etc.), a detailed history of one of baseball's greatest centerfielders. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WILD ONES by C. Alexander London
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Bold deeds, betrayals, and buffoonery kick off this series with gusto. (Animal fantasy. 10-12)"
Treacherous urban pets try to renege on an ancient deal with the wild residents of a city alleyway, and a young raccoon finds himself caught in the middle in this all-animal dramedy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WE DINE WITH CANNIBALS by C. Alexander London
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Fans will be glad of the promise of an adventure in Atlantis to come; Celia and Oliver know adventure is only thrilling when it happens to someone else. (Humorous adventure. 10-14)"
Is it any wonder 11-year-old twins Oliver and Celia Navel hate explorers, given that all explorers ever do is nearly get them killed? Television is so much safer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WE ARE NOT EATEN BY YAKS by C. Alexander London
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Art not seen. (Adventure. 9-14)"
Eleven-year-old twins Celia and Oliver Navel have little in common with their famous explorer parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREAT ESCAPE by C. Alexander London
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 15, 2017

"Agenda-driven from 'howl to snap'—but with action aplenty to go with considerations of complex issues. (Animal fantasy. 10-12)"
The Moonlight Brigade sallies out from Ankle Snap Alley to free the local zoo's captive creatures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SCATTERING OF JADES by Alexander C. Irvine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2002

"Smartly written, unclichéd."
Intelligent and strongly written debut historical-fantasy by a descendant of P. T. Barnum's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 2009

"Especially appealing is how the author shows young readers that history is not static, but dynamic, organic and ever-changing. (introduction, glossary, further reading, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10 & up)"
Mann adapts his acclaimed portrait of the Americas before European conquest and settlement into an engrossing, highly readable account for young people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 12, 2005

"An excellent, and highly accessible, survey of America's past: a worthy companion to Jake Page's In the Hands of the Great Spirit (2003)."
Unless you're an anthropologist, it's likely that everything you know about American prehistory is wrong. Science journalist Mann's survey of the current knowledge is a bracing corrective. Read full book review >