Search Results: "Charles Clarke"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2002

"A sharp taste of Himalayan climbing and the way harsh terrain can make a person disappear as if from the face of the earth."
Two climbing-team members recount a doomed 1982 attempt at Everest from the Chinese side with mounting uneasiness as the expedition falls apart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO WOKE THE BABY? by Jane Clarke
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 8, 2016

"A playful anti-bedtime book—and a whimsically literal introduction to the 'butterfly effect.' (Picture book. 3-5)"
Cumulative verse and bold art define this picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILBERT THE HERO by Jane Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2011

"This fish story smells stale already. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Big brother shark thinks quickly and saves the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILBERT THE GREAT by Jane Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: June 5, 2005

"Youngsters will sympathize with Gilbert, and take comfort in the outcome of Clarke's sweet story, which she manages to tell with sensitivity and humor. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When his best friend Raymond moves away, Gilbert, a great white shark, is terribly sad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BETTY’S NOT WELL TODAY by Gus Clarke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 15, 2003

"This first American edition is well worth the price of a sturdy paperback. (Picture book. 2-7)"
A girl and her doll are sick in bed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E I E I O by Gus Clarke
adapted by Gus Clarke, illustrated by Gus Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Good fun. (Folklore/Picture book. 2-7)"
Any new edition of ``Old MacDonald'' needs a compelling novelty to justify its existence; here, the author-illustrator of Eddie and Teddy (1991) comes up with an elaborate scheme of incorporating the animals' ``quacks,'' ``moos,'' etc., in cartoon-style balloons that are cleverly integrated into the text on the verso pages where they are first introduced; on the rectos, the animals assemble in their increasing numbers to issue a comical cacophony for new readers to sort out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW MANY DAYS TO MY BIRTHDAY? by Gus Clarke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 16, 1992

"Danny's state of mind is not so much exaggerated as emphasized with a wry good humor that just may give kids a clue as to how their elders see them. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Here's a book that's as focused as its small protagonist, who can't wait for the big day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN GREEN MONSTERS by Gus Clarke
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"After he gets his just deserts, young readers are sure to go back to the beginning to check out the preceding byplay once again; fortunately, the sturdy pages and binding should withstand plenty of rereadings. (Picture book. 3-7)"
An unusually appealing book with a number of surefire features, not least of which are the eponymous monsters ``standing on the wall'' who, one by one, ``accidentally fall'' in the classic tradition—as revealed by opening a broad flap on each spread. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCRATCH `N' SNIFF by Gus Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 15, 1998

"Clarke's dry wit is evident in every line of this wry tale; his humorous illustrations of the bumbling but lovable Sniff and the crafty but harmless Scratch enliven an already comical text. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A clever plot masterminded by a shrewd feline is the basis of this engaging olfactory mystery by Clarke (Ten Green Monsters, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHARLES TAYLOR

Reliant as they were on call girls, cars, corpses, and Kris Kristofferson, the B-movies of the 1970s may not qualify as high art, according to cultural critic Charles Taylor, but at least they took American audiences seriously.

“For me, the staying power of these movies has to do with the way they stand in opposition to the current juvenile state ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

AL CAPSELLA AND THE WATCHDOGS by J. Clarke
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 28, 1991

"What's special is Al's mellow tone: he may find his parents inconvenient or incomprehensible, but he views them with an amused tolerance that's both hilarious and endearing (and, one hopes, contagious). (Fiction. 11-15)"
In an engaging sequel to The Heroic Life of Al Capsella (1990), Al continues his affectionate sparring with parents who are almost as outlandish as they seem to his embarrassed 15-year- old eyes. Mrs. Capsella, successful author of romances, has given Al a notably lumpy, badly sewn, homemade beanbag chair that proves to contain all the ``Home Duties presents'' (apron, egg- timer, etc.) her mother had forced on her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHT TRAIN by Judith Clarke
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2000

"A believable, gripping story, unrelenting and tragic. (Fiction. YA)"
Seventeen-year-old Luke struggles to keep his sanity while his family, his girlfriend, and his school tragically ignore, mistreat, or misunderstand his symptoms. Read full book review >