Search Results: "Charles F. Kielkopf"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 11, 2014

"A scrupulously intellectual but enormously conservative program for restoring 'traditional morality.'"
An elaborate, prudish philosophical program for combating the moral meaninglessness of modern life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EAGLE BIRD by Charles F. Wilkinson
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1992

"Engaging if not particularly well-integrated, Wilkinson's essays exemplify the land-based ethical systems now developing among progressive western thinkers and honorably maintain the nature-upholding tradition of John Muir and Aldo Leopold."
In 12 pithy essays, an environmental lawyer debunks romantic myths of ranchers, miners, and foresters as ``heroes of the West,'' and denounces ``extreme laissez-faire'' government policies that have allowed these ``heroes'' to devastate the land, water, and air for their private profit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREEDOM'S ALTAR by Charles F. Price
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1999

"Well written, and cutting deeply into the theme of racial prejudice."
The sequel to Price's Hiwassee (1996), answering some moral questions left hanging in the earlier novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIWASSEE by Charles F. Price
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1996

"But few recent novels have caught with such conviction the true texture and profound emotions of that conflict."
A grim, convincing, remarkably assured first novel about the darker byways of the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"By no means a definitive biography, but not flack-fluff either; and, for all its slant, the most informative text available on the man who would be President. (Sixteen pages of photographs- -not seen.)"
If Clinton wins the White House, he should consider choosing as his press secretary either author of this subtle panegyric. ``This biography,'' write Allen and Portis, ``is a thorough examination of a man who dreamed of being president...from his earliest days.'' Thorough, perhaps, but also delicately biased. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1988

"An excellent postscript suggesting 'further reading'—from Plato to Saul Bellow—appends this intelligent collection."
The prime minister of Conservatism and a government professor at Claremont McKenna College (Cal.) co-edit a greatly revised version of American Conservative Thought in the Twentieth Century (1970; out of print). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TUPAC AMARU REBELLION by Charles F. Walker
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2014

"A readable, not-too-scholarly story of a significant moment in South American history."
A solid new history of the Peruvian Indian revolutionary lays out the roots of his rebellion and its bitter legacy. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHARLES TAYLOR

Reliant as they were on call girls, cars, corpses, and Kris Kristofferson, the B-movies of the 1970s may not qualify as high art, according to cultural critic Charles Taylor, but at least they took American audiences seriously.

“For me, the staying power of these movies has to do with the way they stand in opposition to the current juvenile state ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DARK TERROR by William F. F. Wood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"A fast-paced space adventure with intriguing sci-fi elements and compelling characters."
A mysterious threat is about to complicate Calvin Range's quest to find the hidden pieces of a superweapon. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

YOUR BEST BETS FOR FASCINATING SF/F/H READS IN JULY
by John DeNardo

Summer reading season is in full swing, and if you'd like to join the beach party, there's plenty of entertainment to be found in the pages of science fiction, fantasy, and horror books. July's cream of the crop includes stories about a robot hitman, a dark and previously unseen perspective on Peter Pan, a woman with supernatural ...


Read the full post >

BLOG POST

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE: FORERUNNER TO AMERICAN HORROR
by Andrew Liptak

It’s almost a rite of passage in high school: your English teacher takes out Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic American novel The Scarlet Letter, and you, as a student, have to slog through the antiquated prose and story for several weeks. Friends and family don’t remember the book fondly, but recently, I’ve begun to understand just how critical The Scarlet Letter and ...


Read the full post >