Search Results: "Charles G. Waugh"


BOOK REVIEW

G. by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1972

"Ultimately (and ignoring the common reader whom it will defeat) it is an arresting, inordinately vital, impersonal, and remarkable work."
G. as anonymously archetypal as the use of the initial suggests, is the novel or rather anti-novel of the prominent British art critic and Marxist humanist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A NEWBERY ZOO by Martin H. Greenberg
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1995

"There are biographical notes on each of the authors at the end, making this useful for teachers wishing to introduce the award-winning authors through read-aloud selections, or where there is a demand for materials of good literary quality that do not require long attention spans. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Third in an anthology series based on the work of Newbery Medal-winning authors (following A Newbery Christmas, 1991 and A Newbery Halloween, 1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G-SPOT by Noire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 25, 2005

"Raunchy and rough, but it moves."
Payback time for a good girl gone bad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G-REX by Teri Daniels
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The story isn't messy like life, it is just aimless, and Pearson's artwork is too frail a scaffolding to give this shapeless narrative any structure. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A little brother gets a chance to be as teasing and bullyish as his big brother in this bit of purposeless wish-fulfillment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 22, 1982

"All in all, then: a spotty collection that's inferior in most respects—including introductory material—to Hoch's own much more generous All But Impossible anthology (1981)."
Neither of the locked-room masters—John Dickson Carr and Clayton Rawson—is represented in this collection of twelve stories; for classics, the editors turn instead to three of the most over-familiar items imaginable (Poe's "Rue Morgue," Conan Doyle's "Speckled Band," and Futrelle's "Cell 13"). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1989

"Generously proportioned, agreeably priced, and most certainly worthwhile."
Another "Mammoth Book of. . ." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1989

"Overall, an anthology of interest primarily to occult-fiction completists."
The authors collected here should know about the occult—nearly all of them are dead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 30, 1984

"Except for a foolish 1937 pulp piece about antimatter, then: an attention-worthy gathering—even if the arbitrariness of the assemblage irritates."
Another "best of" collection, with a particularly tenuous premise: twelve stories, 1839-1966—representing the "first appearance of an interesting idea" (though even here Asimov quibbles a bit). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 1, 1987

"Good addition to a popular series of theme anthologies."
These ten very different tales feature young magic-workers, and will appeal to a variety of readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 12, 1982

"Entertaining, often YA-ish, certainly browse-worthy tales—but, overall, mutton dressed as lamb."
Forget the pretentious "dictionary" label: this admittedly mammoth, 50-piece collection—with its contrived categories ("knights," "judicial system," "women," etc.) and haft-witted definitions ("children—persons between infancy and puberty; the offspring of human beings")—is just another gab-bag, despite the noisy packaging. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE 13 CRIMES OF SCIENCE FICTION by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 1979

"Some marvelous material, but a strained anthology."
Though a good deal better than Malzberg-and-Pronzini's Dark Sins, Dark Dreams (1978), this crime/sf anthology makes you wonder whether maybe the idea itself is jinxed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A no-holds-barred yet ultimately moving portrait of a major literary talent. (Photographs—not seen.)"
The second and final installment of Stannard's monumental, definitive biography (Evelyn Waugh, 1987) of one of the 20th century's most accomplished—and, apparently, misanthropic— writers. Read full book review >