Search Results: "Charles Rowan Beye"


BOOK REVIEW

ODYSSEUS by Charles Rowan Beye
Released: Feb. 11, 2004

"Lively, informative, and great fun: the perfect introduction to Odysseus and the society that shaped his exploits."
Synthesizing material from the Iliad, the Odyssey, and other ancient sources, a "biography" of the legendary Greek hero that doubles as a vivid history of Bronze Age customs and beliefs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY HUSBAND AND MY WIVES by Charles Rowan Beye
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Like an autobiographical Revolutionary Road from a gay husband's perspective, although this unorthodox story ends on a happier note."
A gay man's reflections on his marriages to two women and one man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROWAN by Robin McKinley
by Robin McKinley, illustrated by Donna Ruff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 19, 1992

"The realistic events are unexceptional, but McKinley recounts them with grace; meanwhile, in her picture book debut, Ruff nicely conveys the child's tender concern and the dog's gradually renewed liveliness. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A pleasant book describing how the young narrator looks for an appropriate breed ("Irish wolfhounds were big and gentle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"A pleasant trifle. (Fiction. 9-13)"
The legendary archer inspires a worthy daughter in a lightweight fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: June 1, 2005

"Even though not all of the storylines are fully realized, readers of the earlier titles will be satisfied. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Rowan, daughter of the woodwife Celandine and Robin Hood, vows to avenge her mother's death by slaying the four knights who burned her cottage and her within it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROWAN AND THE TRAVELERS by Emily Rodda
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"The storytelling may be patchy (thanks to plenty of heavy hints, readers will have solved the riddle long before Rowan), but this Australian series shows signs of heading in promising directions. (Fiction. 10-12)"
A second mysterious threat to his isolated village prompts the humble herd boy introduced in Rowan of Rin (not reviewed) to prove again that a weak body can hide a hero's heart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROWAN AND THE ZEBAK by Emily Rodda
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2002

"Solid. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In the fourth in this fantasy series by Australian Rodda (Rodda and the Keeper of the Crystal, p. 50, etc.), Rowan follows the patterns set forth in previous titles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUND OF ROWAN by Henry H. Neff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2007

"Though the scenery feels familiar, the book will connect with its audience. (Fiction. 10-14)"
When Max McDaniels has a peculiar run-in with an ancient Celtic tapestry, it's not long before he receives a letter of invitation to the mysterious Rowan Academy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 2008

"An uncritical but colorful picture of a offbeat character who convinced many that he was a genius."
Stage-magic historian Steinmeyer (Art and Artifice: And Other Essays of Illusion, 2006, etc.) examines the quirky life of Charles Fort (1874-1932). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: July 15, 2001

"This is not a piece that exactly pulls the reader along, but it is clear and informative and makes a creative life in science seem worthy and satisfying. (Biography. 10+)"
In the introduction to Patent's cogent, thoughtful biography of Charles Darwin, she explains his importance as an icon of science, for without his discovery of evolution through the mechanism of natural selection, "biology makes no sense." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"The language here is spare, even simple, but the images are complex, challenging in the way surrealist art defies ordinary perceptions, juxtaposing the whimsical and the frightening."
If it's permitted to speak of such a thing as a national character under our current tyranny of globalism, then there's a definite Eastern European, even Slavic, flavor to the entries in this collection. Read full book review >