Search Results: "Charles Sullivan"


BOOK REVIEW

NUMBERS AT PLAY by Charles Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 18, 1992

"Full citations to the art, with brief but informative comments on the artists. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 4-8)"
In a counting-book companion to Sullivan's Alphabet Animals (1991), the numbers up to 10 as seen in works of art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Poetry Title and Author Index,'' fortunately, includes prose. (Nonfiction. 8+)"
Though the intention here is admirable, the subtitle is misleading at best. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALPHABET ANIMALS by Charles Sullivan
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"A splendid way to introduce fine art—or the alphabet. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Twenty-six glorious works of art, distinguished by their appeal for children, excellent reproduction, and variety—a lion from a Japanese photographer, Calder's folded kangaroo, an ancient Iranian ibex in bronze, an abstract-expressionist whale, a romantic tiger by Delacroix, a Warhol rhinoceros. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Lovely. (Poetry. 10+)"
That many of these animals are not imaginary at all hardly detracts from the excellent selection of more than 80 poems juxtaposed with stunning works of art—photos, paintings, drawings, and sculpture—in this sequel to Sullivan's Imaginary Gardens (1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN FOLK by Charles Sullivan
adapted by Charles Sullivan, illustrated by Warren Infield
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Stick with more vibrant collections, such as Neil Philip's American Fairy Tales (1996), Mary Pope Osborne's American Tall Tales (1991) or Robert D. San Souci's Cut from the Same Cloth (1993). (Folklore. 9-12)"
Sullivan (Imaginary Animals, 1996, etc.) strips some classics of all their energy, rendering the tellings bloodless and often boring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BALL by Mary Sullivan
by Mary Sullivan, illustrated by Mary Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 2013

"Deceptively simple little winner for dog lovers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The single word "ball" comprises the text of this visual chronicle of a day in the life of a dog and his ball. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON LINDEN SQUARE by Kate Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Pleasant but inconsequential. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Stella Mae loves to sit at her apartment-house window and watch her neighbors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OZZIE AND THE ART CONTEST by Dana Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2013

"Once the story's lesson is revealed, there is little reason to read this one again. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Ozzie enters the art contest at school only to be disappointed at the results. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANKIE by Mary Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"Two-legged pups with new sibs would likely have a similar experience. (Picture book. 4-6)"
A young new dog in the house gets a cold reception from the old one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I USED TO BE A FISH by Tom Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"While the book is visually appealing, the plot is very thin and not likely to inspire demands for rereading. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Fed up with the aquatic life, a fish ventures onto land, spawning eons of evolutionary change. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KAY KAY'S ALPHABET SAFARI by Dana Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2014

"Kids will enjoy the silliness, and there's lots of potential for the classroom. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Themed alphabet books are like the Little Engine that Could—they just keep on comin'. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHARLES TAYLOR

Reliant as they were on call girls, cars, corpses, and Kris Kristofferson, the B-movies of the 1970s may not qualify as high art, according to cultural critic Charles Taylor, but at least they took American audiences seriously.

“For me, the staying power of these movies has to do with the way they stand in opposition to the current juvenile state ...


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