Search Results: "Charles de Lint"


BOOK REVIEW

DINGO by Charles de Lint
ANIMALS
Released: March 13, 2008

"Miguel is a nifty character, and his dad even more so, and the satisfying ending is romantic as heck. (Fantasy. 12+)"
Miguel Schreiber and his dad, a former biker who buys and sells comics and vinyl, live in the Point near the ocean. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE (GRRL) LOST by Charles de Lint
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Expanded from an earlier short story, this will appeal to those unwilling to leave the Borrowers behind. (Fantasy. 12-14)"
T.J. is still trying to get her mind around the move from the farm and her beloved horse to the suburbs outside de Lint's Newford, when she discovers a really sharp and stylish teen runaway named Elizabeth inside her new house. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAINTED BOY by Charles de Lint
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"De Lint is usually much better than this. (Urban fantasy. 12 & up)"
A disappointing effort cobbled together from a number of mythologies and cultures, overlong and underimagined. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPIRITWALK by Charles de Lint
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1992

"A disappointment from the author of Jack the Giant Killer and Drink the Moon."
A ``fix-up'' to de Lint's Moonheart (1984), consisting of one short and three long stories previously published separately and a brief prologue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CATS OF TANGLEWOOD FOREST by Charles de Lint
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 12, 2013

"A satisfyingly folkloric, old-fashioned-feeling fable. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Rather than let Lillian Kindred die of a snakebite, the titular cats turn her into a kitten, and thereby hangs this sweetly magical tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOONLIGHT AND VINES by Charles de Lint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Often intriguing, with a dreamily original flavor and atmosphere, though lacking the impact of de Lint's Newford novels (Someplace to be Flying, 1998, etc.)."
A second collection of tales set in the North American city of Newford (Dreams Underfoot, 1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEVEN WILD SISTERS by Charles de Lint
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 14, 2014

"There is a promise of more stories at the ever-so-satisfying end, which comes with the tiniest hint of romance past and future—readers will be enchanted. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Beautiful bookmaking, lovely storytelling and wondrous illustrations make for a splendid sequel-of-sorts to The Cats of Tanglewood Forest (2013). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DREAMING PLACE by Charles de Lint
Released: Oct. 30, 1990

A tale of threat and transformation involving two cousins with charms and promises in the spirit world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORESTS OF THE HEART by Charles de Lint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2000

"Splendid ideas and an intriguing plot marred by self-indulgent flab and gab: disappointing after top-notch work (Someplace to be Flying, 1998) last time out."
Another of de Lint's urban fantasy novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEPLACE TO BE FLYING by Charles de Lint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"De Lint's best so far."
Another urban fantasy (Trader, 1997, etc.) set in the fictional town of Newford, from Canadian writer de Lint. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INTO THE GREEN by Charles de Lint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Thin as tissue paper, insubstantial as air."
The Green is how de Lint (Dreams Underfoot, The Little Country, Spiritwalk, etc.) recasts Faerie, accessible to those with the (now many times diluted) Summerblood that confers magical abilities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMS UNDERFOOT by Charles de Lint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Tidy tales, with tingling openings, mundane middles, and limp or elusive endings: initially appealing but far from memorable."
Nineteen associated tales, 1987-93, from the author of Spiritwalk (1992), etc., two previously unpublished, the remainder deriving from magazines, small presses, and minor anthologies. Read full book review >