Search Results: "Charlotte Mosley"


BOOK REVIEW

LOVE FROM NANCY by Charlotte Mosley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Mitford and Waugh wrote about so well elsewhere. (Photographs)"
The first collection of Nancy Mitford's letters—which, like those of her British literary contemporaries (Evelyn Waugh, Harold Acton, Cyril Connolly, et. al), reflect a wit and style that never quite mask an underlying anguish at a world changed too much. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MITFORDS by Charlotte Mosley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Marvelous fun, though the abundance of in-jokes and private language makes the book most enjoyable for readers already familiar with the Mitford legend."
More than 800 pages of letters provide an engrossing, deeply personal group portrait of six idiosyncratic sisters whose political views varied as much as the trajectories of their famous—often notorious—lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 13, 2008

Ex-con Socrates Fortlow, the conscience of South Central Los Angeles (Walkin' the Dog, 1999, etc.), returns for another dozen interlinked adventures, most of them revolving around dialogues on tough or taboo subjects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 8, 2012

"Ingenious and mystical, although readers familiar with fantasy and science fiction will find little new or provocative here. Fans of Mosley's gumshoe noir books (or Blue Light, 1998, his earlier foray into the domain) will certainly wish to investigate."
Moving far from the milieu of Easy Rawlins and Socrates Fortlow (Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, 1997, etc.), Mosley offers two novellas in one volume, part of a series entitled Crosstown to Oblivion, the common theme being, "a black man destroys the world." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 1991

"This is the inheritance with which the son seeks to grapple, and it is a tribute to his honesty and insight—as well as to the rakish recklessness and demonic ability of his subject—that it's hard to resist a measure of sympathy for one who has hitherto been regarded as beyond the pale."
A memoir of the late British Fascist leader by his novelist son Nicholas Mosley (Judith, 1990, Serpent, 1989, etc.) may seem problematic, but as a biography of a controversial father by a loving and cleareyed son it is surprisingly charming. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HESPERIDES TREE by Nicholas Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 2001

"Not an easy read, but not to be missed."
An 18-year-old boy's conflicted coming-of-age is dramatized with quiet intensity in this suggestive, fascinating latest from the British author of the critically praised Catastrophe Practice sequence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE SCARLET by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2004

"The real strength of Easy's narrative, though, is his unflinching recognition that in working with the police, he's crossing the same border that's driven his brothers and sisters to violence."
Easy Rawlins sizzles as Watts burns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEAR ITSELF by Walter Mosley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 2, 2003

"Paris (Fearless Jones, 2001) ends by wrapping up a mystery with perhaps a dozen too many tangles, accepting himself as a killer, and guaranteeing that no matter how well he succeeds in his errands to the powerful and fearsome, he'll never get rich."
Inoffensive bookseller Paris Minton's friend Fearless Jones drags him from the safety of his shop into more trouble—big, big trouble—in 1955 Watts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEARLESS JONES by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

Even before sultry Elana Love walks into mild-mannered Paris Minton's life three months after his Watts bookstore opens, Mosley can't resist his signature scene: A pair of cops stroll into the shop determined to push Paris around just because he's a black man and it's 1954. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHITE BUTTERFLY by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 1992

"As usual, plotting, setting, dialogue, and social comment are all as mannered as Raymond Chandler and—if the manner doesn't put you off—nearly as compelling."
Watts sometime-detective Easy Rawlins (Devil in a Blue Dress, A Red Death) is married when Mosley picks up his tale in 1956, but he still hasn't settled down: He's never told his nurses'-aide wife Regina about the property he owns or how he spends his days, and the local law still leans on him for help when they're up against it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST DAYS OF PTOLEMY GREY by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 11, 2010

"Borrowing from Faust, the Iliad and Gran Torino, Mosley (Known to Evil, 2010, etc.) unforgettably transforms Ptolemy's cacophony of memories into a powerful symphony that makes him 'into many men from out of all the lives he had lived through the decades.'"
An ancient man living in solitary squalor in Los Angeles is offered an experimental medicine that just might beat back his creeping dementia—and will almost certainly kill him in the process. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG FALL by Walter Mosley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 24, 2009

"Plotting has never been Mosley's strong point, but McGill, a red-diaper baby, ex-boxer and a man eternally at war with himself, may be his most compelling hero yet."
The creator of Easy Rawlins, Socrates Fortlow and Fearless Jones introduces a new detective struggling to live down his checkered past in present-day New York. Read full book review >