Search Results: "Charlotte Zolotow"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1973

"Individual readers might find something to latch onto here; to expect more than that would be overpraise indeed."
Facile would be the best adjective to apply overall to these ten stories, and only Updike's "Tomorrow and Tomorrow and So Forth" (recently anthologized in Spinner's Live and Learn, KR, p. 693, J-241) and Doris Lessing's "Flight" escape that designation entirely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1986

"A worthwhile collection."
A companion piece to An Overpraised Season: Ten Stories of Youth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLOCKS OF BIRDS by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: Sept. 1, 1981

"But it's an uninflected, almost unindividuated reverie from end to end."
First published in 1965 with illustrations by Joan Berg, this was characterized by Kirkus originally as "another evocative story for the inert"; and there is no reason to alter that judgment now. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEDAY by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: March 24, 1965

Wryly stated and amusingly illustrated, these are the dreams of glory shared by small girls — nothing muscular, no mountains climbed, armies conquered or animals felled but Someday: "I'm going to come home and my brother will introduce me to his friends and say 'This is my sister.' Instead of 'Here's the family creep'"; or, "My mother and father are going to say, 'Why are you going to bed so early?'" Fun in three nicely laid on colors for low pressure laughter in an area usually reserved for boys. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY GRANDSON LEW by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: March 1, 1974

"The warm, shimmering pictures will no doubt help to make this as popular as Zolotow's other tender memories, though personally we could do without those 'eye hugs' particularly since William Pene Du Bogs makes them look like maniacal gleams from some bearded, white robed ghost."
Though he was only two when Grandpa died, Lewis at six suddenly remembers him, and calls his mother to his room in the night to tell her about how he misses him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1967

"Walter Stein's imaginative drawings, his sharp lines and soft washes and spots and squiggles."
On a succession of sparkling, surprising pages appears a series of bad, bad poems. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAY IT! by Charlotte Zolotow
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Zolotow's text was first published in 1980, but it still resonates with today's parents and children, particularly as imagined by Voake. (Picture book. 3-5)"
As a mother and daughter enjoy "a golden, windy autumn day," the daughter urges her mother to "say it." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 25, 1972

"This is one of Zolotow's more dewy-eyed tributes to friendship."
Zolotow's brief repetitive text (presumably one little girl talking to her friend) is given the dimension it lacks by di Grazia's palpably rendered pictures of two bundled-up little girls, first seen against a drear brown landscape ("Dark black clouds and the wind sighs. . . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHANGES by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: April 1, 2015

"Though touted as a child's 'first' poetry collection, Zolotow's heartwarming seasonal verse charms all ages. (Picture book/poetry. 4 & up)"
A newly gathered collection of timeless seasonal poems originally published in the 1960s, '70s, and '80s, with all-new illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY FRIEND JOHN by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: March 13, 1968

"It's a slightly off-center approach to the give-and-take of best-friendship, aptly drawn out by Ben Schechter who has few equals for glowering determination or the sidelong smile."
Another much-in-little with a complementary thesis similar to the conclusion of If It Weren't For You (1966, 509, J-169) by the same team. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANEY by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: May 30, 1973

"Janey it's lonely all day long since you moved away" . . . and so as the soft brown and yellow drawings show a little girl walking alone reading at home or being tucked into bed, the text proceeds with the memories she mentally addresses to her absent friend: how Janey's voice sounded, how she skipped rocks in a pond, how they could sit together without talking, etc. There is no false cheer in the form of a new friend at the end, only the vague hope that "maybe some day we'll grow up and live near each other again" — and the consolation for similarly lonely readers that someone shares their feelings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN I HAVE A LITTLE GIRL by Charlotte Zolotow
Released: Nov. 3, 1965

"It staggers, while it delights, the imagination that all the way back to Neanderthal days, mothers were probably restraining their daughters from tickling the fox-faced furs of the imposing ladies in front of them."
From the illustrations, the girl narrator could be one of Eloise's cousins— on the brunette side of the family but also directly descended from the same double jointed imp. Read full book review >