Search Results: "Chen Jiang Hong"


BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE EAGLE by Chen Jiang Hong
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 30, 2007

"Fans of Emily Arnold McCully's Beautiful Warrior (1998) may be mildly appreciative. (Picture book. 7-9)"
The creator of The Magic Horse of Han Gan (2006) offers another set of big, dramatic illustrations done in a classical Chinese style—but this time in service to a poorly written (or poorly translated) story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGIC HORSE OF HAN GAN by Chen Jiang Hong
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 1, 2006

"Shelve this plainly told tale next to such similar tales of artistic transformations as Elizabeth Partridge's Kogi's Mysterious Journey (2003), Margaret Leaf's Eyes of the Dragon (1987) or the various renditions of 'The Boy Who Drew Cats.' (author's note) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Hong illustrates this new, if familiarly premised, legend about a historical Tang Dynasty artist with big, splendidly accomplished paintings, brushed on brown silk in a traditional style. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HONG KONG by Stephen Coonts
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"High-tech gimmickry, kitchen-sink plotting, stick-figure characters. For devoted fans only."
It's the near future, and China's grip on Hong Kong goes slack—not unlike Coonts's latest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 18, 2012

"Through text that reads like dynamic blog material and flows with the hyperactive flare of an anxious father of three, the narrative moves along seamlessly with enthusiasm, parental trepidation and a healthy dose of sardonic humor."
A neurotic American father of three relocates his family to Hong Kong for one year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 1992

A concise retelling, with both text and illustrations framed in ogee arches. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2000

"Bordwell is not well known outside academic film circles, but he should be; perhaps this volume will give him the exposure he deserves."
One of our most inventive film scholars, Bordwell (Film Studies/Univ. of Wisconsin) takes on one of the most overthetop cinemas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JADE STONE by Caryn Yacowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 1992

"A tale about artistic integrity, told with such artful simplicity that it'll be easily accessible to young children. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-9)"
When the Emperor of China is given a perfect piece of jade, he orders master carver Chan Lo to form from it ``a dragon of wind and fire.'' But Chan Lo can carve only what he hears in the stone, and the gentle, playful sounds emanating from this noble piece speak of a graceful trio of carp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOURTH QUESTION by Rosalind C. Wang
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 1991

"Unusually satisfying. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
A well-told, nicely balanced story with an admirable message. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"This book won't tell you, either. (50 b&w photos)"
Journalist Dannen (Hit Men, not reviewed) and Hong Kong film maven and collector Long take a look at one of the world's most vital cinemas, one that's facing an uncertain future under its new Chinese rulers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HONG KONG, CHINA by Ralph Arnote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Good company and a fine breakfast have totally cured my jet lag''), many readers may ask: Where is James Clavell now that we need him?"
Arnote, an old paperback mystery hand, debuts in hardcover with a trashy and rather tedious tale of Hong Kong on the eve of its reversion to China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 6, 1993

"Plausible, well-supported prophecies."
Incisive but dispassionate speculations about the future, come 1997 and beyond, of Britain's last vestige of glory and empire as Hong Kong reunites with China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST YEAR IN HONG KONG by Robert Elegant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1997

"More a work of political punditry—admittedly sound and persuasive—than a lyrical celebration of love and romance."
From veteran writer Elegant (Bianca, 1992, etc.), a novel that gives star billing to Hong Kong and the upcoming Chinese takeover rather than to the pair of lovers whose creaky love story is ostensibly its subject. Read full book review >