Search Results: "Chris Riddell"


BOOK REVIEW

OTTOLINE AND THE YELLOW CAT by Chris Riddell
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2008

"Shelve this, the first volume of a projected three, with the graphic novels. (Fiction. 10-12)"
A tale told in intricate, finely detailed pictures linked by occasional brief bursts of prose introduces Eloise-like young Ottoline, who shares a large apartment with hair-covered sidekick Mr. Munroe, collects odd single shoes and postcards from her parents (who are generally off on travels) and solves mysteries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WENDEL’S WORKSHOP by Chris Riddell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"A pretty face, undeniably, but void of hidden depths. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Young Wendel is a mouse and an inventor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GREAT BIG CUDDLE by Michael Rosen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Despite (or perhaps because of) the odd bits, this book successfully celebrates the private, gleeful, imaginative world of toddlers. (Picture book/poetry. 1-5)"
Short poems and accompanying illustrations make up this word-format poetry anthology for little ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PIED PIPER OF HAMELIN by Russell Brand
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"A smart, funny, iconoclastic take on an old classic. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
The well-known legend is brought to life once more by one of the U.K.'s most famed comics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RETURNER'S WEALTH by Paul Stewart
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"Red meat for rabid dragon lovers, but younger fans of the authors' Edge Chronicles may be discomfited by the gruesome bits and steamy clinches. (Fantasy. 12-16)"
A young wanderer enters the Wyrmeweald—a mountainous land of sudden death, untold riches, and dragons, dragons, dragons—in this grim trilogy opener. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BARNABY GRIMES by Paul Stewart
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2008

"From the first gripping sentence onward, Barnaby will be sure to rake in the fans. (Horror. 9-12)"
The latest and best Stewart/Riddell collaboration to date is set in a pseudo-Victorian world of stovepipe hats, gamins and smog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SLEEPER AND THE SPINDLE by Neil Gaiman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"If this book isn't quite a masterpiece, it's certainly a treasure, and that's more than enough. (Fairy tale. 11-18)"
Is it fair to expect a masterpiece when Gaiman and Riddell work together? Probably. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE IMMORTALS by Paul Stewart
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

Stewart and Riddell cap their Edge Chronicles with a large-scale grand tour and cast reunion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUDDLE EARTH by Paul Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2007

"Steer readers with a taste for spoof quest epics to the likes of Terry Pratchett's Discworld tales, Jodi Lynn Anderson's May Bird in the Ever After (2005) or the granddaddy of them all, the Harvard Lampoon's Bored of the Rings (1969). (Fantasy. 11-13)"
The title, an anemic volcano dubbed "Mount Boom" and a late bit of verse are the only connections to Tolkien in this long, lame farce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOTH GIRL AND THE GHOST OF A MOUSE by Chris Riddell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"A promising start to a weird new series. (Mystery. 8-12)"
Ada Goth solves a mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLATYPUS by Chris Riddell
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2001

"Well-known as a political cartoonist, Riddell conveys his message subtly and with good humor. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Riddell (Rabbit's Wish, 2001, etc.) reaches out to the preschool set in this charming environmental primer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EMPEROR OF ABSURDIA by Chris Riddell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Political cartoonist and Greenaway Medalist Riddell is comfortable in this curious fantasy world as imagination transforms the ordinary bedroom objects of this charming blue-eyed, tousled towhead into extraordinary dreams. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This young emperor has clothing issues; the beginning sentences set the scene: "The Emperor of Absurdia was having the most extraordinary dream. Read full book review >