Search Results: "Christie Watson"


BOOK REVIEW

TINY SUNBIRDS FAR AWAY by Christie Watson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 10, 2011

"A memorable debut novel about a Nigerian girl's coming of age."
Uprooted from the comforts of Lagos by her parents' divorce, a 12-year-old girl must cope with dire poverty and violence in the Niger delta. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE WOMEN ARE KINGS by Christie Watson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 28, 2015

"A multilayered, sophisticated book that gets to the heart of what family is and what we will do to love them."
London-born Elijah is just 5 years old when he's taken from his Nigerian birth mother, Deborah, because of signs of abuse, but he still dreams of her when adopted by the British foster parents—one white, one of Nigerian origin—who are determined to heal his wounds and give him a new life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLANT THE TINY SEED by Christie Matheson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Preschoolers need to learn how plants grow. This supplies the basics, but novelty (an arguably waning term for app imitators on paper) is not a substitute for compelling art. (notes) (Picture book. 2-5)"
This companion to Matheson's two previous titles featuring interactivity (Tap the Magic Tree, 2013; Touch the Brightest Star, 2015) encourages listeners to tap, press, and swipe their way through gardening. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

TOUCH THE BRIGHTEST STAR by Christie Matheson
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 26, 2015

"A delightful bedtime book that encourages both imaginative play and restorative rest. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A nocturnal companion to Matheson's Tap the Magic Tree (2013), this interactive picture book illuminates nighttime's wonders while shepherding readers toward sleep. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAP THE MAGIC TREE by Christie Matheson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A universal theme, developed in an unusually clean, simple presentation…and, at least, with no need for batteries. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Matheson invites readers to take an apple tree through a seasonal round using taps and page turns in place of touch-screens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THANKSGIVING AT OUR HOUSE by Wendy Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

"A welcome addition to Watson's attractive holiday books. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A family prepares for and celebrates a traditional Thanksgiving, with relatives, old and young, coming from near and far. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALKING TO ANGELS by Esther Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1996

"A debut of uncommon, nearly perfect grace. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A book of beautiful mixed-media illustrations, with the look of children's scribbles: painted and repainted, scratched and drawn-over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICA UNDERGROUND by Christie McFall
NONFICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Index. (Nonfiction. 10+)"
Beneath our feet—but not beneath our attention—there are more than four times as many miles of pipe carrying oil, gas, and other materials as there are miles of railroad track above ground in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBBY FIGHTS THE WORLD by Joel Christie
Released: Nov. 18, 2009

"A portrait of the realistic bravado of teens struggling to find their place in the world."
This coming-of-age story, set in present-day Florida, may leave adult readers with a sad view of today's teens but engage the younger crowd. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VENOMOUS by Christie Wilcox
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Wilcox writes in a lively style, but the book is likely of greatest interest to those already drawn to the subject."
How the creatures that embody some of mankind's deepest fears use toxic substances to defend themselves against predators and to prey on the creatures they eat—and why this is important to us today. Read full book review >