Search Results: "Christina Diaz Gonzalez"


BOOK REVIEW

MOVING TARGET by Christina Diaz Gonzalez
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"An adventure that will keep readers engaged until the cliffhanger ending and leave them waiting for the next book. (Adventure. 9-12)"
Take a precious relic, add a secret organization and an ancient brotherhood, throw in some action, place it all in the Eternal City, and what do you get? A grand adventure! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RETURN FIRE by Christina Diaz Gonzalez
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A satisfying end to this plot-driven adventure. (Adventure. 9-12)"
Cassie Arroyo returns in the sequel to Moving Target (2015). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A THUNDEROUS WHISPER by Christina Diaz Gonzalez
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"An engrossing tale set against a compelling, seldom-seen backdrop. (Historical fiction. 10-18)"
Amid the chaos of the Spanish Civil War, a young girl begins to find her place in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RED UMBRELLA by Christina Diaz Gonzalez
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 11, 2010

"Gonzalez enters the literary scene with this exceptional historical novel that portrays the beginning of the Cuban exodus. (Historical fiction. 10 & up)"
This is the story of Lucía, a Cuban girl who, at the age of 14, leaves her hometown of Puerto Mijares and flies to the United States from Havana with her little brother, Frankie, but without their parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTINA STEAD by Hazel Rowley
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A welcome study of an underrated author. (16 pages of photos, not seen)"
An absorbing biography that will help Stead's fans place her fiction in the context of her life and may well attract new readers to her work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

Trying to find color and beauty in her childhood world of the California Mojave Desert, Maya (the author/illustrator as a young girl) uses her artistic propensities to seek out objects that stand out from their dusty surroundings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Inspiring and peacefully thought-provoking. (Picture book. 5-8)"
In sweeping lyrical prose—in both English and Spanish—a little girl describes her special relationship with the river she loves, which loves her in return. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTINA ROSSETTI by Jan Marsh
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"The author's steady, sympathetic course through Rossetti's divided life enables readers to delve into the intense and original self most fully expressed in her poetry. (16 pages b&w photos and illustrations, not seen)"
An adept survey of the outwardly placid, internally conflicted life of an English counterpart to Emily Dickinson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALL ME TREE / LLÁMAME  ÁRBOL by Maya Christina Gonzalez
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"An exquisitely crafted call to honor ourselves, one another and the natural world. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The author of I Know the River Loves Me / Yo sé que el río me ama (2009) offers a bilingual picture book that presents the triumphant journey from seed to tree, conveying a deep appreciation for nature.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEEPING CHRISTINA by Sue Ellen Bridgers
FICTION
Released: June 30, 1993

"Though the language here rarely sparkles and the pace bogs down at times, Bridgers's accessible story will have real validity for those who've been used by Christina and her kind. (Fiction. 12- 16)"
We've all met them—the manipulators who contrive to turn families and friends against one another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRIETITA AND THE GHOST WOMAN by Gloria Anzaldúa
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"The text appears in both Spanish and English; dramatic illustrations with the bold forms of mural art completely fill each spread, laden with southwestern flora and Mexican motifs. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Anzald£a (Friends from the Other Side, 1993, etc.) offers a feminist interpretation of the familiar Mexican legend of la Llorona, the sobbing ghost woman who steals children at night. Read full book review >