Search Results: "Christina Hopkinson"


BOOK REVIEW

THE PILE OF STUFF AT THE BOTTOM OF THE STAIRS by Christina Hopkinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 25, 2011

"A mixed bag—the sly comedy and cleverness regarding the fate of modern women (nothing—your body, your house, your children—looks as it does in the magazines) is almost drowned by the relentless anger of the heroine."
A British novel asks who is more maddening: a couple of preschool boys, or their man-child father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 12, 2012

"Rich in voice, humor and dazzling imagery, studded with edgy ideas and wildly original, this multicultural mashup—like its heroine—defies categorization. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Noted for her fantasy and science fiction for adults, Hopkinson jumps triumphantly to teen literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"A thorough and absorbing recreation of the ill-fated voyage. (Nonfiction. 8-16)"
In what's sure to be a definitive work commemorating the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, Hopkinson offers a well-researched and fascinating account of the disaster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2006

"What might have been a dry topic is lively, the voices of the children vivid and personal. (Nonfiction. 9+)"
"The voices of children weave through the story of cotton," and the story of cotton weaves through the story of our nation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2006

"Based on eyewitness accounts, the tale brings to life an event young readers will find fascinating. (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
Running away from the county poor farm in Texas, 11-year-old Nicholas Dray arrives in San Francisco penniless. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIVE! by Deborah Hopkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Fascinating World War II history for history buffs and browsers alike. (epilogue, bibliography, source notes) (Nonfiction. 8-14)"
Hopkinson's writing plumbs the depths in relating the undersea exploits of American submariners during World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW MOON’S ARMS by Nalo Hopkinson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 23, 2007

"A winningly told tale filled with regional color."
Hopkinson (The Salt Roads, 2003, etc.) sets her latest in the fictional Caribbean nation of Cayaba. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIN FOLK by Nalo Hopkinson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"These wonderful duppy and jumby things leave you with a belly full of good feelings, like dumplings bobbing in you like you've never tasted before."
Fifteen Afro-Caribbean-flavored fables, some set in Toronto, by lauded Locus Award winner Hopkinson (Brown Girl in the Ring, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARIA'S COMET by Deborah Hopkinson
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Pair this with Don Brown's Rare Treasure (p. 1223), about Mary Anning and her fossils. (Picture book/biography. 5-10)"
From Hopkinson (Birdie's Lighthouse, 1997, etc.) comes another strong, simply told story, based loosely on the life of 19th- century astronomer Maria Mitchell, about a girl with a particular kind of wanderlust. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Nonfiction at its best and a good companion to Mary Jane Auch's Ashes of Roses (2002), Johanna Hurwitz's Dear Emma (2002), and other recent works on the subject. (foreword, afterword, timeline, notes, photo credits, index) (Nonfiction. 9+)"
Between 1880 and 1919, 23 million people came to America, most through the port of New York and most from eastern and southern Europe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN GIRL IN THE RING by Nalo Hopkinson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1998

"A splendid if often gruesome debut, superbly plotted and redolent of the rhythms of Afro-Caribbean speech: 'You just don't let she go, or I go zap the both of allyou one time.'"
Winner of the publisher's First Novel Contest (out of nearly 1,000 entries), Hopkinson's debut evokes Afro-Caribbean magic against a near-future Toronto damaged by riots and neglect and abandoned by all but the most desperate inhabitants. Read full book review >