Search Results: "Christine Brown"


BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTINE by Stephen King
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 29, 1983

"King's blend of adolescent raunch, All-American sentiment, and unsubtle spookery has never, since Carrie, been more popcorn-readable—with immense appeal for all those fans interested in the 522-page equivalent of a drive-in horror movie."
The Exorcist meets My Mother, The Car. . . in a chiller that takes a nifty Twilight Zone notion and stretches it out to King-sized proportions—with teen-gab galore, horror-flick mayhem, epic foreshadowing, and endlessly teased-out suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN by Richard Rodriguez
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2002

"Elegant, controversial, and altogether memorable."
A poetic, often contrarian meditation on race in modern America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTINE FALLS by Benjamin Black
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2007

"A good story, and gorgeous writing."
A boozy, bitter pathologist becomes a most unwilling detective when he uncovers a baby-trafficking scheme in Dublin in the 1950s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEEDING CHRISTINE by Barbara Chepaitis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 2000

"Four likable women and an unusual plot that lets readers learn to know them: a fine debut."
Memory, tradition, and family are the ingredients for a tale about how food can save the soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN by James Polster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"Good fun, if ultimately shallow."
A rollicking, at times extremely funny, tall tale disguised as a detective novel, careening with Hunter Thompsonesque panache through the restaurants, bars, and haunts of the corrupt rich in San Francisco, that classic mystery milieu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: Oct. 30, 1993

"Sweet wondrous life to live' seems—well, sweet, it's also piquantly ironic in light of the struggles awaiting these promising, much-beloved children. (Poetry. 5+)"
Enchanting period photos of young African-Americans, which Myers collected from "dusty bins in antique shops, flea markets, auction houses, and museum collections." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN BROWN by John Hendrix
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Not a story for the younger set, but an important view of one of the most controversial men in American history. (author's note, sources, index) (Informational picture book. 8-12)"
John Brown, with a makeshift flag in one hand and a tiny African-American tot cradled in the other, stands heroically on the jacket of this handsome picture-book biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"A stirring life story recounted in straightforward, serviceable prose."
Biography of the disabled Irish artist and author whose life story inspired the Oscar-winning film My Left Foot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BASIC BROWN by Willie Brown
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"The scattershot narrative, breakneck gallop through topics large and small, seductive name-dropping and, above all, Brown's impregnable self-confidence add up to what feels like a genuine encounter with an unforgettable character."
The legendary California politician and power broker struts his stuff. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOLLY BROWN by Kristen Iversen
NON-FICTION
Released: July 5, 1999

"A pastiche of reminiscences and newspaper clippings that tries to set the record straight and certainly suggests that, as important as the myth of the golden-hearted Western girl may be, the real Margaret was far more interesting than the cinematic versions. (b&w photos, not seen)"
The real Margaret (she was never called Molly) Brown revealed in a biography long on both dramatic reconstructions of the Titanic disaster and mundane family scrapbooks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN BROWN by Gwen Everett
BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 1, 1993

It takes searching through three notes—by the chief historian at Harper's Ferry, a curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts (which owns the art), and the editor—plus what seem to be the 1941 paintings' original titles (listed in the back; year given only in jacket copy) to piece together the bases of this powerful presentation. Read full book review >