Search Results: "Christine Gross-Loh"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 2, 2013

"Current alarm over U.S. student global rankings will help give this persuasive book the consideration it deserves."
An intriguing look at parenting paradigms in countries where children are deemed to be the best adjusted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 5, 2016

"With its academic tone and spirited, convincing vision, revolutionary new insights can be gleaned from this book on how to approach life's multifarious situations with both heart and head."
A popular college instructor explains how ancient Chinese thought can be applied to everyday life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTINE by Stephen King
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 29, 1983

"King's blend of adolescent raunch, All-American sentiment, and unsubtle spookery has never, since Carrie, been more popcorn-readable—with immense appeal for all those fans interested in the 522-page equivalent of a drive-in horror movie."
The Exorcist meets My Mother, The Car. . . in a chiller that takes a nifty Twilight Zone notion and stretches it out to King-sized proportions—with teen-gab galore, horror-flick mayhem, epic foreshadowing, and endlessly teased-out suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"Szpirglas, who describes himself as 'Just a guy who happens to think weird animals and gross facts are cool,' lists 38 researchers and experts consulted in an impressive concluding page of 'Amazingly Awesome Acknowledgments.' (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
Face it, Szpirglas tells us, the world we live in is definitely gross—and we're pretty yucky, too. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTINE FALLS by Benjamin Black
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2007

"A good story, and gorgeous writing."
A boozy, bitter pathologist becomes a most unwilling detective when he uncovers a baby-trafficking scheme in Dublin in the 1950s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEEDING CHRISTINE by Barbara Chepaitis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 2000

"Four likable women and an unusual plot that lets readers learn to know them: a fine debut."
Memory, tradition, and family are the ingredients for a tale about how food can save the soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Scholars of Stuart England will find much here that's intellectually provocative, especially in the realm where law and social history meet, but the general reader will want a bit more human drama mixed in with the intellectual abstractions. (15 photos, not seen)"
A mildly interesting analysis of the 1631 trial of the infamous earl of Castlehaven, who was beheaded for sodomy and rape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BREAKING THE TONGUE by Vyvyane Loh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2004

"One of the most ambitious and accomplished debut novels in recent memory."
A Chinese family's divided loyalties are tested in the crucible of war in this dramatic first novel, set in Singapore during WWII, on the eve of the Japanese invasion and occupation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MADWOMAN IN THE VOLVO by Sandra Tsing Loh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2014

"A funny, frank and hopeful memoir of middle age."
A writer and syndicated radio host's no-holds-barred account of how she survived the rigors of midlife crisis and menopause. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 12, 2008

"Like a long dinner date with that melodramatic, motor-mouthed best friend you can't imagine life without."
Outspoken writer/performer Loh tells all about being an industrious minivan-driving mom during a particularly brutal midlife crisis: "the year I exploded into flames." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IF YOU LIVED HERE, YOU'D BE HOME BY NOW by Sandra Tsing Loh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"If some of Loh's comic references are a bit shopworn (corporate promotional parties, showbiz talk), that doesn't mean they aren't dead-on funny and true."
The author's patented sly under-30 humor renders her first novel a triumphant addition to a canon that already includes an essay collection, Depth Takes a Holiday (1996), and her much-feted one-woman show, ``Aliens in America.'' If Bronwyn Peters is such a good young liberal, listening to NPR, giving money to good causes and stalwartly maintaining a bohemian lifestyle in the wasteland of Tujunga, a tract-house suburb not far from L.A., how come so many bad things keep happening to her? Read full book review >