Search Results: "Christopher Corr"


BOOK REVIEW

DEEP IN THE WOODS by Christopher Corr
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 2, 2017

"Corr's artwork is a feast for the eyes. Dazzling. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A variety of woodland creatures live in a house they find in the woods until a bear brings disaster; but together they build anew in this retelling of a classic Russian folk tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREAT RACE by Christopher Corr
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 4, 2018

"Ultimately, Corr delivers a handsomely packaged story that begs the questions, from where did it arise, and whom is it for? (Picture book. 3-6)"
In this retelling of Chinese lunar calendar lore, the animals race to claim a spot in the zodiac. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON'T SPILL THE MILK!  by Stephen Davies
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A satisfying story, perfect for reading aloud, set in a part of Africa that is rarely shown in children's books. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Penda, a young Fulani girl from Niger, takes a long journey by herself to bring her shepherd father a nourishing bowl of milk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUAN'S SWEET AND SPICY MEMORY by Hee Jung Yoon
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2017

"The disparate visual and textual mélange of misinformation renders this well-intended but off-the-mark title skippable. (further information) (Picture book. 5-8)"
In this child's introduction to Mexico, Juan prepares for the Cinco de Mayo festivities in his town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL ABOARD FOR THE BOBO ROAD by Stephen Davies
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"A delightful introduction to a lively way of life. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Climb onboard a busy bus in Burkina Faso. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A YEAR FULL OF STORIES by Angela McAllister
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2016

"Quibbles aside, this attractive anthology will prove useful. (Folk tales. 7-11)"
A seasonal collection of world folk stories. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL
by Brianna Jewell

“Stick your nose into other people’s business and it’s considered rude,” Christopher de Hamel says, “but stick your nose far enough back and it’s considered history.” In his latest book, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval World, de Hamel turns what he sees as the voyeuristic pleasure of discovering secrets about others’ lives into historical ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WRATH OF ZOZIMOS by Christopher Ford
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"The jokes are funnier than in volume one, but readers may wish there were more space between them. (Graphic adventure. 11-14)"
This graphic novel is an epic at the speed of a flipbook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMAL SURPRISE! by Christopher Gunson
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Full-bleed backgrounds of bold color that set off the central figure in their equally bright palettes are the perfect accompaniment to this surprising and engaging offering. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Intensely colored vignettes feature a menagerie of animals as they tell their brief and funny tales. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN DENVER’S TAKE ME HOME, COUNTRY ROADS by Christopher Canyon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

Canyon has outdone himself in his second pairing with a John Denver tune, this one about returning home to the place of his roots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINGS by Christopher Myers
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Ikarus himself. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Myers (Black Cat, 1999, etc.) comes into his own as a children's-book writer, as well as illustrator, with his second solo picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1994

"A handsome edition, with especially felicitous typography and design. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
A scrupulous note explains that, with ``minimal'' editing, this is the great Russian collector Afanasev's version, ``crafted by Petr Nikolaevich Polevoi (1839-1902), a well-known historian, archaeologist, and Shakespearean scholar.'' In outline, it differs little from Arthur Ransome's text as used in Uri Shulevitz's Caldecott winner (1968); but where Ransome is more literary and humorous, the more straightforward text here is propelled by its energetic cadence. Read full book review >