Search Results: "Christopher Dickey"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SLEEPER by Christopher Dickey
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"An uneasy mixture of New World Order ruminations and old-fashioned derring-do that shows just how hard le Carré must work to get the mixture of moral revulsion and conscientious tradecraft just right."
Dickey makes an ambitious bid to retool the American spy novel for a post-9/11 landscape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INNOCENT BLOOD by Christopher Dickey
Released: June 1, 1997

"As a result, the sporadically suspenseful narrative lacks the menace it obviously was intended to have in recounting the metamorphosis of a likely all-American lad into an alienated avenger."
A first novel from Newsweek correspondent Dickey (Expats, 1990, etc.) that honorably attempts—and ultimately fails—to detail the making of a latter-day terrorist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 3, 2009

"Well-reported examination of cutting-edge police work."
A journalist with remarkable access explains how the New York City Police Department has set the standard for preventing terrorist attacks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 21, 2015

"A great book explaining the workings of what Dickey calls an erratic, cobbled-together coalition of ferociously independent states. It should be in the library of any student of diplomacy, as well as Civil War buffs."
In this biography of Robert Bunch, the British consul in Charleston, South Carolina, at the beginning of the Civil War, Daily Beast foreign editor Dickey (Securing the City: Inside America's Best Counterterror Force—The NYPD, 2010, etc.) illustrates how an outside observer can understand more about a situation than the parties involved.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"An amazing portrait of a man who was a destructive force with a larger-than-life ego and who was also a man of intense passion, high intellect, and a delicate, artistic sensitivity. (First serial to the New Yorker)"
This moving memoir by the famous poet's son pulls no punches: James Dickey was a hard-drinking, prevaricating braggart whose bad behavior destroyed his family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEARS IN THE STREETS by Lisa Dickey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"An affecting travelogue that reveals true Russian personality."
Adventures in Russia over three trips in 20 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOSTLAND by Colin Dickey
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"An intriguing but somewhat uneven exploration of things unseen."
"If you want to understand a place, ignore the boasting monuments and landmarks, and go straight to the haunted houses." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POEMS, 1957-1967 by James Dickey
Released: June 1, 1967

"Masculine, compassionate, essentially conservative, Dickey's poems are incarnations of remembered joy and pain, a quietly intense celebration of the senses, an acceptance of the inherently tragic yet wonder-awakening landscape of man—the qualities, in short, of a good national poet circa the sixties."
James Dickey, fresh from winning a National Book Award and an appointment as Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress, has also recently been enshrined in one of Life magazine's pictorial essays where the Dow Jones rating was a smashing "presently the hottest of emerging U.S. poets." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ZODIAC by James Dickey
Released: Oct. 8, 1976

"Intense and ardent solipsism, not Dickey at his best."
The Zodiac is a long poem, a short book; as Dickey explains in a prefatory note, it's loosely based on another poem of the same title, written by a Dutch sailor before his death by storm at sea in 1940. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1968

"The best pieces here are the tributes to Roethke, Aiken, Marianne Moore, and the solid analyses of five classics."
James Dickey's reputation as a critic is based on plain speaking and the lauding of sound, humane, even homey values. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 13, 1970

"Alas, lately he has shown a hunger to be king of the hill; foolishly reaching to the sky he can only embarrass his admirers."
It is hard to be a religious poet, even, or especially, in the pantheist, humanist, autobiographical twentieth century mode of James Dickey. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO THE WHITE SEA by James Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A ruthless adventure of body and soul by a writer of mature- -even awesome—powers."
Dickey doesn't write many novels—three in 23 years—but he makes every one count. Read full book review >