Search Results: "Christopher Meades"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST HICCUP by Christopher Meades
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2012

"An allegorical tale ripe with symbolism."
Meades (The Three Fates of Henrik Nordmark, 2010) draws literary fiction from 1929 Russia, where young Vladimir awakens one morning with hiccups, yelps occurring precisely every 3.7 seconds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANNA WHO FELL FROM THE SKY by Christopher Meades
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"An engrossing, richly layered novel."
On the verge of her arranged marriage, a teenage girl begins questioning the cult she has been raised in. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOODBYE MY BABY by Christopher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 2014

"A complex, powerful concept strained by its own length and ambition."
Ware's debut novel spans decades, taking on the abortion debate from the immediate aftermath of Roe v. Wade to the present day. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL
by Brianna Jewell

“Stick your nose into other people’s business and it’s considered rude,” Christopher de Hamel says, “but stick your nose far enough back and it’s considered history.” In his latest book, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval World, de Hamel turns what he sees as the voyeuristic pleasure of discovering secrets about others’ lives into historical ...


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BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"An exciting bragging-rights adventure on the basketball court, around and beyond planet Earth and back again. (author's note) (Picture book. 6-10)"
Two teens on a city basketball court start a game of matching each other's shots. Miss five tries and you are out! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MERWIN by Christopher Hart
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Merwin does pull a fast one on the zookeeper by claiming he is Merwin in disguise, giving a small 'what is reality' twist to the story, but it's not enough to elevate it beyond its one-note joke into an entertainment. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Cartoonist and bestselling author of drawing books, Hart's first picture book is goofy all over, but whether or not that is intentional is open to debate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WRATH OF ZOZIMOS by Christopher Ford
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"The jokes are funnier than in volume one, but readers may wish there were more space between them. (Graphic adventure. 11-14)"
This graphic novel is an epic at the speed of a flipbook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMAL SURPRISE! by Christopher Gunson
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Full-bleed backgrounds of bold color that set off the central figure in their equally bright palettes are the perfect accompaniment to this surprising and engaging offering. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Intensely colored vignettes feature a menagerie of animals as they tell their brief and funny tales. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN DENVER’S TAKE ME HOME, COUNTRY ROADS by Christopher Canyon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

Canyon has outdone himself in his second pairing with a John Denver tune, this one about returning home to the place of his roots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINGS by Christopher Myers
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Ikarus himself. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Myers (Black Cat, 1999, etc.) comes into his own as a children's-book writer, as well as illustrator, with his second solo picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1994

"A handsome edition, with especially felicitous typography and design. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
A scrupulous note explains that, with ``minimal'' editing, this is the great Russian collector Afanasev's version, ``crafted by Petr Nikolaevich Polevoi (1839-1902), a well-known historian, archaeologist, and Shakespearean scholar.'' In outline, it differs little from Arthur Ransome's text as used in Uri Shulevitz's Caldecott winner (1968); but where Ransome is more literary and humorous, the more straightforward text here is propelled by its energetic cadence. Read full book review >