Search Results: "Christopher Silas Neal"


BOOK REVIEW

GO TO SLEEP, LITTLE FARM by Mary Lyn Ray
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"It's difficult indeed for a bedtime book to stand out, and this one doesn't quite deliver. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Ray and Neal tackle the tried-and-true theme of bedtime on the farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I WON'T EAT THAT by Christopher Silas Neal
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 14, 2017

"You will read this (and reread it, too). (Picture book. 3-6)"
A finicky cat searches for a meal to satisfy its hunger in this darkly humorous tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERYONE by Christopher Silas Neal
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 10, 2016

"There is no shortage of outstanding picture books that address children's feelings of anger, frustration, anxiety, and joy. This is not one of them. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Neal explores the well-trodden notion that everyone has feelings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OVER AND UNDER THE POND by Kate Messner
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2017

"A magical artistic and informational world that readers will delight in visiting again and again. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
The author-illustrator team that brought readers into the garden and under the snow (Over and Under the Snow, 2011, etc.) now takes them on a breathtaking journey beneath the calm waters of a pond. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OVER AND UNDER THE SNOW by Kate Messner
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Utterly charming, and informative, to boot; readers brought up on a diet of rhymes, bright colors and adorable fluffy animals will find its simple beauty a balm. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
A young child enjoying a full day of cross-country skiing narrates this gentle tale, explaining both her own activities and what the animals are doing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIFETIME by Lola M. Schaefer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"Kudos for not dumbing it down, however. A more cohesive theme would make for a more understandable overall presentation, but readers will get their money's worth. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
An original concept that begins simply and ends up surprisingly—and somewhat confusingly—complex. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL
by Brianna Jewell

“Stick your nose into other people’s business and it’s considered rude,” Christopher de Hamel says, “but stick your nose far enough back and it’s considered history.” In his latest book, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts: Twelve Journeys into the Medieval World, de Hamel turns what he sees as the voyeuristic pleasure of discovering secrets about others’ lives into historical ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

AVA AND THE LITTLE FOLK by Neil Christopher
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2013

"The story is long for the picture-book format, but children who enjoy fairy and folk tales will find the story of Ava an unusual and compelling one. (author's note, glossary, pronunciation guide) (Picture book. 6-9)"
An unhappy, orphaned boy in Canada's far north finds a new way of life with the help of a group of tiny, magical dwarves who adopt him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLAY’S QUILT by Silas House
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 30, 2001

"An appealing and promising debut."
A Kentucky author's plaintive debut tells the story of coal miner Clay Sizemore's efforts to understand and possess his own history, shattered when he was a three-year-old present at his own mother's murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COAL TATTOO by Silas House
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 2004

"Sometimes marred by a monotony in its characterizations, but, overall, a gentle tale with appealingly flawed people and an exquisite sense of the quotidian."
Third in a multigenerational saga (A Parchment of Leaves, 2002, etc.) of a Kentucky mountain family with tragedy to burn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PARCHMENT OF LEAVES by Silas House
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2002

"From the raptures of Appalachian Spring to the many, complicated facets of women's lives in that time and place: a superb combination of wonder and suffering."
Breathtaking both for its beauty and its pain, House's second (after Clay's Quilt, 2001) tells a finely nuanced tale of a Kentucky mountain family in the tumultuous WWI era, as the taking of a Cherokee bride unleashes passions that create life and destroy it. Read full book review >