Search Results: "Claire Henley"


BOOK REVIEW

HOT POTATO by Neil Philip
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 19, 2004

"Eating Through a Day (2000) or William Cole's classic Poem Stew (1981). (Poetry. 7-10)"
A rich, if skimpy, portion of reprinted verse, this pairs generally cheery scenes of children and grownups chowing down around tables, on a picnic blanket, in a tub, and sundry other venues, with the likes of Russell Hoban's encomium to a "Friendly Cinnamon Bun," and Lewis Carroll's to "Beautiful Soup." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FISH IS ME by Neil Philip
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 2002

"A truly buoyant tribute to the family tub. (Poetry. 3-7)"
A compilation of effervescent poems celebrate tub time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAM LOVER by Virginia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"A few sordid moments, but should satisfy romance readers who like their stories sensuous. (Author tour)"
In historical romances, where sex ranges from a premarital chaste kiss to a velvetized version of down-and-dirty, British veteran Henley weighs in at the erotic end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE RIVER SWEET by Patricia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Sentimental, but readable and sincere all the same."
Poet, storywriter, and second-novelist Henley (Hummingbird House, 1999) offers a historical romance that goes back and forth between the contemporary Midwest and 1960s Vietnam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHINIEST JEWEL by Marian Henley
Released: Sept. 15, 2008

"Spare, poetic storytelling conveys a tender, bare-bones depiction of personal growth, told simply enough to engage young and old alike."
In her first contribution to the growing genre of graphic memoir, syndicated cartoonist Henley (Laughing Gas, 2002, etc.) recounts the life-altering events following her decision to adopt a child in her late 40s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A YEAR AND A DAY by Virginia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1998

"That, and an element of frank eroticism, make this one an enjoyable (if unsurprising) addition to Henley's shelf of historical romance genre."
Historical high jinks in medieval Scotland, as the ``wild, untamed'' Jane Leslie, daughter of the steward of Dumfries Castle and a woman gifted with the power of healing, finds herself increasingly fascinated by the handsome, brooding, and secretly desperate Lynx de Warenne, a warrior nobleman more concerned with finding a wife and fathering a successor to his knightly holdings than subduing the unruly Scots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WOMAN OF PASSION by Virginia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1999

"Written in reckless, slamming prose that mirrors its redheaded heroine's blazing tantrums."
Henley's 16th dish of romance (A Year and a Day, 1998, etc.) tells of commoner Bess Hardwick's life from ages six to forty as she rises from poverty to become Queen Elizabeth's lady-in-waiting and to make a spectacular marriage to the richest lord in England, all the while taking full advantage of the period's sexy freedoms. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARRIAGE PRIZE by Virginia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"For those with a lower melting point than Rosamond's, scenes like this should induce many pulse points of pleasure."
Closing volume in Henley's Plantagenet trilogy (The Dragon and the Jewel, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BORDER HOSTAGE by Virginia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 10, 2001

"Colorful scenery compensates a bit for the predictable story and breathy prose ('When her liquid tremors caused his white-hot seed to erupt, he was sheathed so deeply that they merged and became one')."
Henley (A Woman of Passion, 1999, etc.) is an old hand at spicy romances, and this time out she sets her scene in the borderlands between England and Scotland. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUMMINGBIRD HOUSE by Patricia Henley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 1999

"Kate and her good deeds don't shine as brightly as they should in this schematic take on the suffering of the innocents."
In a carefully crafted but overwrought first novel, an American midwife experiencing compassion fatigue cannot escape the claims of love and duty. Read full book review >