Search Results: "Claire Messud"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 19, 2008

"A satisfactory historical fiction novel that could use more edge and polish."
A sweeping yet compact saga that traces one woman's life from wealth and affluence to a Chicago brothel, as she learns to rely on herself in the face of numerous obstacles and challenges. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUNTERS by Claire Messud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"As smart as they are affecting, these stories aren't novels: it's in their brevity that they loom so large."
Forgive Messud (The Last Life, 1999, etc.) for subtitling this set of novellas "two short novels," and reject the impulse to make sense of the juxtaposition of two beautiful tales of people contending with solitude: each story succeeds in standing alone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST LIFE by Claire Messud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A broad canvas, unflinching and clear eye for the truth, and a family tale that never fails to compel and that reverberates universally, as a fine saga should."
Messud returns (When the World Was Steady, 1995; not reviewed) capably indeed, with an intelligent coming-of-ager about a teenaged girl half-American and half—Algerian-French. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOMAN UPSTAIRS by Claire Messud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 30, 2013

"Brilliant and terrifying."
A self-described "good girl" lifts her mask in Messud's scarifying new novel (The Emperor's Children, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EMPEROR’S CHILDREN by Claire Messud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2006

"Intelligent, evocative and unsparing."
A stinging portrait of life among Manhattan's junior glitterati. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BURNING GIRL by Claire Messud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 29, 2017

"Emotionally intense and quietly haunting."
Messud (The Woman Upstairs, 2013, etc.) investigates the fraught intricacies of friendship and adolescence as two girls grow up and grow apart in a small Massachusetts town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLAIRE MARVEL by John Burnham Schwartz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Very precious, very trite-seeming. Love Story it's not."
An acutely sensitive love story, the sort in which feelings and psyches are so fragile that the normal ups and downs of true love become near-fatal wounds. Here, a thirtysomething man recalls his haunting love for an elusive and complex woman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RESCUING CLAIRE by Thomas Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 1991

"Still, Johnson pulls off this first novel, turning trite material into delightful muscular prose that makes him a writer to watch."
A clever, well-written trot through student life in 1960's Wisconsin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Claire on Lafayette Square by Judith Chouteau
Released: June 18, 2014

"The message of friendship trumping serious challenges comes through clearly despite sometimes-cringe-worthy rhymes."
In an awkwardly rhyming picture book about helping a friend overcome an illness, debut author Chouteau introduces Claire, a fun-loving, caring redhead in the diverse neighborhood of Lafayette Square, St. Louis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLAIRE DE LUNE by Christine Johnson
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 18, 2010

"Claire is a sympathetic character, though her love interest seems too idealized and one-dimensional and the conclusion entirely too tidy—in the end, there is not much to set apart this reworking of a familiar idea. (Supernatural romance. 12 & up)"
An enjoyable if forgettable supernatural romance, this debut novel will be appreciated by teens who can't get enough of the genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELEANOR, ARTHUR, AND CLAIRE by Diana Engel
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"With the importance it places on creativity in relationships and in working through grief, unusual and effective as well as appealing. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Claire loves visits with Grandma, a painter, and Grandpa, a sculptor. Read full book review >