Search Results: "Cole Gibsen"


BOOK REVIEW

LIFE UNAWARE by Cole Gibsen
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 28, 2015

"This well-intentioned story would have profited from a more delicate touch. (Fiction. 14-18)"
The persecutor becomes the persecuted when personal texts and emails are leaked, outing Regan Flay as the scheming mean girl she really is. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SENSHI by Cole Gibsen
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 8, 2013

"Never terribly fraught or demanding, but with a twisty plot and death-defying action, this romance delivers teen yearning with martial arts kicks. (Paranormal romance. 12 & up)"
Rileigh, or Senshi as she was once known, is a sassy high school girl in love with her boyfriend, Kim. It just so happens that her relationship with Kim has spanned 500 years—Rileigh is a powerful, reincarnated samurai warrior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHINOBI by Cole Gibsen
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 8, 2014

"A swift tale of romance for the young teen with a warrior heart. (Paranormal romance. 12-15)"
Rileigh, a beautiful reincarnated samurai, is starting a new life in the finale to the Katana trilogy, which tones down the action even as it ramps up the supernatural suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATANA by Cole Gibsen
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 8, 2012

"Pass. (Paranormal romance. 12-16)"
An ordinary St. Louis teen finds that she has a distinctly un-ordinary legacy when she's attacked in a shopping-mall parking lot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRUDY by Henry Cole
by Henry Cole, illustrated by Henry Cole
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"The deceptively simple story gently nudges children to look at and appreciate animals as more than just barnyard fixtures. (Picture book. 4-8)"
At the country auction, Esme and Grandfather find just the right animal for them: "Not too big, not too small. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2010

"A rare gift: a novel with artwork as whole and vital as a picture book's. (afterword) (Animal fantasy. 6-10)"
Starting outside a house, the reader's viewpoint moves indoors page by page until there "sat Celeste, hunched over her work table" under the floorboards. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON THE WAY TO THE BEACH by Henry Cole
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"Perfect for introducing youngsters to the world around them, and especially appropriate for anyone who visits or lives near the seashore. (answer key) (Picture book. 4-12)"
The mid-Atlantic coast with its myriad plants and animals comes to life in this marvelous search-and-find book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACK'S GARDEN by Henry Cole
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Capped by a lively and elegant design, the book should supplement to an elementary science lesson; what Jack's Garden lacks in personality, it more than makes up for in attention to detail. (Picture book. 3+)"
Cole mimics the cumulative technique of ``The House That Jack Built'' to describe the garden the eponymous hero might tend in his backyard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BAD GOOD MANNERS BOOK by Babette Cole
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 1996

"1958) and the much more recent lessons of Caralyn and Mark Buehner's It's a Spoon, Not a Shovel (1995). (Picture book. 5- 8)"
A rhyming list of dos and don'ts, with the don'ts alluringly depicted in Cole's chaotically zany pencil-and-watercolor illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UN-WEDDING by Babette Cole
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"Loosely drawn line-and-watercolor illustrations portray the bickering couple in hilarious detail, made all the funnier by the posh British backdrop that is their battleground. (Picture book. 6-12)"
Demetrius and Paula Ogglebutt have a problem—their parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DROP DEAD by Babette Cole
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1997

"Pair this with Margaret Wild's Old Pig (1996) for a fairly complete definition of aging and death—one funny, one tender—aimed at the young. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Cole (The Bad Good Manners Book, 1996, etc.) proves that she can fracture more than Emily Post in this eccentric tale subtitled ``Or how we grew from one-year-old bald wrinklies into eighty-year-old bald wrinklies.'' A question from their grandchildren—``Gran and Grandad, why are you such bald old wrinklies?''—prompts two elderly folks to recite the major events of their lives, from birth to the moment they drop dead and are then ``recycled,'' returning as two scrawny chickens. Read full book review >