Search Results: "Colin Paine"


BOOK REVIEW

BIG GEORGE by Eric Pringle
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Paine's pen-and-ink illustrations, reminiscent of Quentin Blake's style, cannot save this tale, but they do add a humorous touch. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Employing devices usually reserved for soap operas, first-timer Pringle tells the tale of a giant from outer space and how he saves the damsel Tilly from an unwelcome marriage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"This lighthearted spin-off chugs along as merrily as the shiny red tractor at the center of it all. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A dragon, a damsel in distress, and a knight in shining armor—recipe for a typical fairy tale? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Paine displays the courage of a frontierswoman and the prose of a poet, making this indispensable for hearty travelers. (3 linecuts and 5 maps)"
On a quest to discover the origins of an exquisite embroidered robe and amulet she found in London, British textile expert Paine chronicles her journeys from Pakistan to Bulgaria through some of the world's wildest outposts of civilization. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PEARL OF KUWAIT by Tom Paine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"An odyssey of the mad that manages to coat warfare in black humor without losing sight of the price being paid by those caught up in its deadly whirlwind."
The Gulf War never seemed so fun—or horrific. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CRUSADES by Michael Paine
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"An adequate synopsis, though hardly original."
A breezy overview of the Crusades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Amusing, sometimes touching account of how Japan's formal and conventional culture beguiled a spontaneous and independent American."
An engaging recounting of a Hewlett-Packard employee's year-plus stint in Japan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCAR VEGAS by Tom Paine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"Anger sometimes overcomes art in these tales, but they're genuine and persuasive enough to signal the presence of something uncommon among today's writers: an old-fashioned social critic and moralist."
A debut collection of tough, angry tales about American arrogance and the world's woes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEA AND CIVILIZATION by Lincoln Paine
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 30, 2013

"A lucid, well-written survey that covers a lot of ground—well, of fathoms."
A sprawling, readable history of the world from the sailor's point of view—and not just on the oceans of the world, but also its lakes and rivers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PRAIRIETON RAID by Lauran Paine
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1994

"One does not have to be a devotee of the western genre to find this book a light and satisfying read."
There's no railroad near the sleepy town of Prairieton, nor are there any telegraph lines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"While readers shouldn—t expect a coherent picture of Indian spirituality, Paine does offer a fresh perspective on various 20th-century personalities, enlightening provided that one is somewhat familiar with them already. (Author tour)"
In these sketches of a dozen Westerners who visited South Asia, ranging from intellectuals of global renown to sociopaths and sexual misfits, Paine, formerly literary editor of the Wilson Quarterly, contemplates the pull that Indian culture has exerted on outsiders of various sorts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 6, 2000

"Overlong, overdone, and overwrought."
In the wake of last year's Robert Hass-edited haiku collection, HarperCollins continues to milk the global poetry market, with mixed results. The `modest and hedonistic` claim of this cheerfully context-free anthology is to `furnish word-treats laid out in a row of continents.` Word-treats there are, in spades: the urbane melancholy of the Brazilian Carlos Drummond de Andrade, the sweet pop lyricism of the Japanese Shuntaro Tanikawa, the anguished starkness of the politically engaged Pakistani Faiz Ahmed Faiz. But the discovery of these jewels is rendered suspect by what we native speakers of English can divine from the (considerably more extensive) Anglophone selection. There's one Sylvia Plath poem here, and it's `Lady Lazarus`; the brief Elizabeth Bishop section includes `One Art.` If the selection criteria for more far-flung literatures are equally canonical, what more offbeat treasures must have fallen by the wayside? To judge from the relative absence of comments on the translation (and complete lack of any testimony from the translators themselves), the process of translation must be as straightforward as making toast: put in a poem and up it pops in another language, golden brown. The editors' introductions have a way of betraying, through sheer overwriting, an unintentional criticism of the project—or even of themselves. As Paine's Read full book review >

BLOG POST

COLIN HARRISON
by Gregory McNamee

In his 1954 James Bond novel Live and Let Die, Ian Fleming observed that owning a large number of books tends to go hand in hand with “serious criminal tendencies.” Bibliophiles may object to the thought, but over the long run of history, collectors of many things—paintings, postage stamps, golf courses—have been implicated in all sorts of crimes connected ...


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