Search Results: "Colin Wells"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Eye-opening in its vast cache of references."
Comprehensive examination of the formative influence of Byzantine culture and scholarship on Western Europe, the Islamic world and the Slavic nations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STELLA'S STARLINER by Rosemary Wells
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 25, 2014

"Fans of Wells' work will likely embrace Stella's story, but some may wish she'd been allowed to confront her problems rather than just running away from them. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Wells' winsome animal characters are charming, as always, but her latest effort lacks coherence and depth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOKO FINDS HER WAY by Rosemary Wells
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2014

"A terrific book to share with children preparing for their first flights as well as Yoko's fans. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Yoko and her kimono-clad mother have an adventure at the airport at the beginning of their trip to Japan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANDS OFF, HARRY! by Rosemary Wells
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2011

"While Wells tidies everything up a bit more neatly than real-life Miss Harmonys are likely to manage, there are some valuable lessons in problem solving and expressing oneself, for both children and educators. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A reptilian kindergartner who can't keep his hands to himself is the focus of this kickoff to a new series from Wells. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOKO WRITES HER NAME by Rosemary Wells
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: July 29, 2008

"As always, believable characters, familiar struggles and warmth fill Wells's work, which teaches a subtle lesson on acceptance and maturity with great clarity. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Wells's familiar kitten Yoko is in kindergarten, and she's just learned how to write her name in Japanese. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX & RUBY'S BEDTIME BOOK by Rosemary Wells
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 21, 2010

"Fun as the stories may be, they miss the inspired twists that make Max such an artful dodger. (Picture book. 3-5)"
This short-story collection from the steady hand of Wells displays the mischievous sweetness of the Max and Ruby stories with their candy-heart coloring, but each could have used a few more pages to bring the stories fully around. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX’S ABC by Rosemary Wells
ABC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2006

"Some of the text is a bit strained to fit the alphabet concept, but it's overshadowed by Max and Ruby's antics and Wells's expressive illustrations that perfectly capture their realistic sibling relationship. (Picture book. 2-4)"
In a lighthearted romp through the alphabet, Wells's endearing rabbit siblings Max and Ruby are back. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOKO by Rosemary Wells
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"The lesson might have been labored; instead, Wells offers some trusty guidance and a light touch, and leaves the conclusions to readers. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The first graders in Mrs. Jenkins's room are quick to criticize the sushi, seaweed, and red bean ice cream that fill Yoko's willow-covered cooler. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX AND RUBY'S FIRST GREEK MYTH by Rosemary Wells
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A novel, entertaining introduction to the myth; better yet, another delightful episode in the saga of this irrepressible bunny. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Ruby catches Max touching her jewelry box despite her sign (``No! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX AND RUBY'S MIDAS by Rosemary Wells
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1995

"It may not carry the serious message about greed that is the heart of the original, but it's an enjoyable spoof. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In a companion to Max and Ruby's First Greek Myth: Pandora's Box (1993), Wells adapts the Greek legend of King Midas to an amusing story-within-a-story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAY HELLO, SOPHIE by Rosemary Wells
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2017

"This is Wells' work at her best—insightful, witty, and beautifully drawn. Once again, she adeptly addresses a childhood concern with great respect and humor. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The delightful mouse Sophie returns, this time to overcome her salutation anxiety with Granny's clever expertise. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

COLIN HARRISON
by Gregory McNamee

In his 1954 James Bond novel Live and Let Die, Ian Fleming observed that owning a large number of books tends to go hand in hand with “serious criminal tendencies.” Bibliophiles may object to the thought, but over the long run of history, collectors of many things—paintings, postage stamps, golf courses—have been implicated in all sorts of crimes connected ...


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