Search Results: "Courtney E. Martin"


BOOK REVIEW

COURTNEY by John Burningham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Witty, well told, and superbly illustrated. (Picture book. 4-8)"
One of Britain's most thoughtful and creative picture-book makers gives a familiar scenario his own inimitable spin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW BETTER OFF by Courtney E. Martin
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Martin writes with conviction and enthusiasm; whether social scientists concur with her remains to be seen."
An exploration of how success in the United States is being redefined. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E by Matt Beaumont
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Your career may depend on it."
Subject: Fab debut of former London adman, making a bugger-all brilliant update on the epistolary novel by having it largely in e-mail thrashing about on the office network and focusing on London's Miller Shanks ad agency striving to land the Coke account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 18, 2011

"The authors note that 'the film…will eventually be housed at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum located at Ground Zero.' A fitting complement to and extension of that film, this thoughtful and uplifting collection will also stand on its own."
Eight individuals and how they rebuilt their lives in the aftermath of 9/11. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIND COURTNEY by Melissa Clark
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Like a practiced spider, Clark (Devlyn, not reviewed) spins a surprisingly tensile web from the slenderest threads possible."
The perfect roommate disappears, leaving behind a perfectly impenetrable mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STE-E-E-E-EAMBOAT A-COMIN’! by Jill Esbaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2005

"The Story of Captain Blanche Leathers (2000), illus by Holly Meade, though its content is closer to William Anderson's comparatively restrained River Boy (2003), illus by Dan Andreasen. (afterword, map) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Inspired by a passage from Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi, Esbaum captures the bustle and commotion attending a steam packet's arrival in a small river town: "Rubberneckers, / pounding boots, / whiskered geezers, big galoots. / Wheels a-clatter, / choking cloud, / yapping dog, excited crowd." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Alienation of Courtney Hoffman by Brady G. Stefani
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Chock-full of sharp tonal contrasts, this tale should appeal to readers with a hunger for alien adventure and an understanding of how it feels to be considered crazy."
A debut novel fuses a serious issue—the stigma of mental illness—with sci-fi to chronicle a girl's unusual coming-of-age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY MARTIN by Ronald L. Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2008

"Martin's star quality prevails."
Affectionate but not airbrushed portrait of the Broadway diva who got her first big break with a naughty Cole Porter song but flew into legend in a children's classic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAN MARTIN by Michael Freedland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 15, 2006

"Dino light and lively; anyone seeking a probing look at the life of Dean Martin should look elsewhere—probably at Nick Tosches's Dino: Living High in the Dirty Business of Dreams (1992)."
A biography of singer-actor Martin that has the pace, diffidence and depth of one of Martin's T.V. variety shows. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN FROBISHER by James McDermott
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2001

"Intriguing if long-winded. (4 b&w maps and charts)"
The first major biography of the early English explorer since William McFee's widely purchased 1928 Life of Sir Martin Frobisher. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTIN DRESSLER by Steven Millhauser
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

"It might be another of Dreiser's densely packed tales of financiers and titans, written at characteristic white heat, but by an immeasurably more graceful stylist."
A chronicle of obsession, self-indulgence, and, in a curious way, moral growth, expertly poised between realistic narrative and allegorical fable, from the author of such intriguing, if sometimes unduly gossamer, fictions as Edwin Mullhouse (1972) and In the Penny Arcade (1986). Read full book review >