Search Results: "Craig McDonald"


BOOK REVIEW

HEAD GAMES by Craig McDonald
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The grisly carnage in McDonald's Spillane-like fictional debut has its roots in a real historical question: Did the Bush family really help hide Pancho Villa's head in the inner sanctum of Skull and Bones? Despite the intriguing premise, not for the faint-hearted."
A turbulent tale of murder, conspiracy and political intrigue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEAD GAMES by Craig McDonald
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The grisly carnage in McDonald's Spillane-like fictional debut has its roots in a real historical question: Did the Bush family really help hide Pancho Villa's head in the inner sanctum of Skull and Bones? Despite the intriguing premise, not for the faint-hearted."
A turbulent tale of murder, conspiracy and political intrigue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINT THE LEGEND by Craig McDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 16, 2010

"Hector's third case (Toros & Torsos, 2008, etc.) is another intriguing and convincing mix of history and hardboiled mystery."
Was the shotgun blast that ended Ernest Hemingway's life on July 2, 1961, really self-inflicted, or was it murder? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE TRUE SENTENCE by Craig McDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 15, 2011

"A rail-thin mystery burdened by an overload of clinical sex."
Hector Lassiter (Print the Legend, 2010, etc.) and his best friend Ernest Hemingway go sleuthing in Paris. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EL GAVILAN by Craig McDonald
Released: Dec. 1, 2011

"McDonald offers another gritty, violent mystery (One True Sentence, 2011, etc.) in this exploration of both sides of a divisive problem."
An Ohio town is racked by violence in a clash of cultures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 17, 2010

"Not necessarily for general readers, but the author provides valuable insight into Constantine's era."
Scholar Stephenson (History/Univ. of Durham; Byzantium's Balkan Frontier: A Political Study of the Northern Balkans, 900-1204, 2000, etc.) offers a stately though academic biography of the first Roman emperor who converted to Christianity, with a heavy emphasis on the archaeological record. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SP4RX by Wren McDonald
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Dec. 13, 2016

"A pulls-no-punches techno-thriller; think Mr. Robot meets The Stepford Wives. (Graphic science fiction. 15 & up)"
In a gritty future, hackers must fight an evil corporation trying to turn humans into mechanically altered zombies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WEATHER by Jill McDonald
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 8, 2016

"While McDonald's art is delightful and the Hello, World! series appears to be promising, she should stick to topics that are close to home. (Board book. 2-4)"
Two youngsters learn about weather and the clothing it requires in this simple introduction that launches the Hello, World! series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHT IGUANA LEFT HOME by Megan McDonald
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"It is full of love, independence, and natural law, and the slice of biogeography can't hurt. (Picture book. 5-9)"
It's not that Iguana is angry or anything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BONE KEEPER by Megan McDonald
Released: March 1, 1999

"The coloring and textures embody the desert setting in the evening, showing the fearsome cave and sandy shadows that wait to release the mystery of the bones. (Picture book. 5-8)"
From McDonald (Tundra Mouse, 1997, etc.), a haunting, dramatic glimpse of the Bone Keeper, a trickster with special transformational powers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPELLBOUND by Janet McDonald
FICTION
Released: Oct. 5, 2001

"Although the ending is a little unbelievable and pat, on the whole it's satisfyingly hopeful. (Fiction. YA)"
Raven Jefferson is 16 and lives with her mother in a housing project in Brooklyn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PROJECT GIRL by Janet McDonald
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Powerful and painful reminder of the enormous gap between the culture of an inner-city black ghetto and middle-class white America—one so wide that education alone cannot be counted on to bridge it."
Anger-filled memoirs, partly straight narrative and partly excerpts from a journal, of a professional black woman whose journey from a low-income housing project in Brooklyn to a law office in Paris is replete with violence, hostility, and alienation. Read full book review >