Search Results: "Craig Pittman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 5, 2016

"An inviting tour through Florida's personality and the colorful characters that make it up."
A chronicle of the eccentric, enigmatic nature of the state of Florida. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 5, 2012

"Though exhaustively researched, the book is not compelling enough to hold the interest of anyone who does not have a personal connection to the material. Read Eric Hansen's Orchid Fever (2000) instead."
An excruciatingly detailed account of the 2002 controversy that rocked Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in Sarasota, Fla., when its scientists were asked to identify an orchid of dubious origin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED'S PLANET by Eddie Pittman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 19, 2016

"A first volume that's truly lively and entertaining; expect a vociferous cry for the next installment. (Graphic science fiction. 7-12)"
A preteen girl frustrated with her life in the foster-care system finds herself redefining family when she unexpectedly crash-lands on an alien planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2011

"The author writes with an acerbic intellect, blending self-deprecation with reflective back-patting into cohesive life stories that are relatable and, thankfully, usually funny."
Crisp, witty dispatches from the domestic front by a former wild child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TILTING AT WINDMILLS by Joseph Pittman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Tepid, get-out-the-Kleenex romance, riddled with greeting-card profundities and one too many windmill metaphors from a writer who is certainly no Cervantes."
A dreary debut about a young man who abandons Manhattan for a new life—and love—in a small town upstate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 31, 1993

"Long on personal anecdote but short on substantive analysis, and gushing with feel-good fixes from a seemingly bottomless reservoir; still, a witty, well-meaning consideration of a serious social problem."
Atlanta psychiatrist Pittman (Private Lies, 1989) returns with an engaging, if not always convincing, assessment of the causes and cures of masculine inadequacy in America today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNCLE PHIL'S DINER by Helena Clare Pittman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 3, 1998

"A charming reminiscence. (Picture book. 5-7)"
On a wintry Sunday morning, Ruthie and her papa set out to walk nine blocks through a snow storm to have breakfast at Uncle Phil's diner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Some wavering, but Signet has a winner here overall."
Eighteen original stories (eleven by women) in a celebratory 50th anniversary anthology of Signet authors and the first hardcover in this publisher's history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONFEDERATE ALPHABET by Rickey E. Pittman
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 15, 2011

"Entirely inappropriate for children. (song lyrics, timeline) (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
Aimed less at children and more at Southern sympathizers, this alphabet book is an ill-conceived paean to the Confederacy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNRISE by Helena Clare Pittman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Enticing on many levels, this book offers an edifying blend of entertainment and instruction. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Effectively joining text and art, this book provides an abundance of repetition to reinforce the concept of numbers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STILL-LIFE STEW by Helena Clare Pittman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1998

"Of course, this ought to be paired with Lois Ehlert's Growing Vegetable Soup (1987) or her Eating the Alphabet (1989) for a story-hour vegetable course. (Picture book. 3-9)"
A book that begins and ends with vegetables, with an art lesson in between. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRISH ALPHABET by Rickey E. Pittman
ABC BOOKS
Released: March 1, 2011

"The device works tolerably but more contextualization and greater sensitivity to the audience level would have made the book more useful. (Picture book. 7-10)"
This luck-of-the-Irish alphabet book cites Irish legends and symbols with intertwined one-stanza poems. Read full book review >