Search Results: "Crystal Hubbard"


BOOK REVIEW

CRYSTAL by Walter Dean Myers
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1987

"And no one can complain about the moral."
The story of a black teen-ager caught in the fast-lane world of modeling, with the personal cost in stress that goes with the glamour and money as the main theme. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST BLACK KING OF THE KENTUCKY DERBY by Crystal Hubbard
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"As a whole, this overview of Winkfield's life as a jockey stands as both a celebration of racing and a snapshot of one determined man. (Picture book/biography. 6-10)"
Indomitable African-American jockey Jimmy Winkfield, known as Wink in horse-racing history, is the subject of Hubbard's dramatic picture-book biography, which explains Winkfield's career struggles as the last African-American to win a Kentucky Derby, in 1902. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"While Duburke's acrylic illustrations beautifully enhance the text, this format just does not seem the right choice for Marcenia's story, one that could have been better told as a picture-book biography. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Marcenia Lyle wants to be a professional baseball player. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLD MOTHER HUBBARD by David A. Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"Notwithstanding Johnson's strong stylistic ties to illustrators such as Randolph Caldecott and E. Boyd Smith, adults are the likeliest audience for this volume. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Although fine lines and a low contrast palette give Johnson's paintings a faded, smudgy look, he effectively captures the classic nursery rhyme's flavor, decking the matronly Mother Hubbard out in sweeping 19th-century gowns that are ruffled, fur- trimmed and elaborately accessorized, then dispatching her to a series of elegantly appointed shops and stalls for goods to lavish on her pampered canine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRYSTAL BLADE  by Kathryn Purdie
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 15, 2017

"With this second installment, the Burning Glass trilogy hits its stride. (map) (Fantasy. 12-18)"
Riaznin is finally free from imperial rule. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRYSTAL BONES by C. Aubrey Hall
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2011

"It's not subtle, but it will carry along some readers on the prose's pure eagerness. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
This enthusiastic but clichéd series opener strings trope after trope on a thread of purple prose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRYSTAL CADETS by Anne Toole
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Skip and pass. (Graphic fantasy. 10-12)"
On her birthday, a teenager learns that she is one of the Crystal Cadets, a textbook group of young, magic-wielding heroines charged with saving the world from vague, clichéd darkness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRYSTAL DOORS by Rebecca Moesta
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2006

"Unchallenging but entertaining fare for middle-schoolers. (Fiction. 11-13)"
The world called Elantya, a wannabe Atlantis with some faux Greco-Roman nomenclature, runs on telepathic powers that are magnified by special crystals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRISH CRYSTAL by Andrew M. Greeley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2006

"For the faithful only. For the rest, Irish treacle."
Father Greeley, that most prolific of blarney-spinners, adds a ninth to his Coyne collection (Irish Cream, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRYSTAL CLEAR by Jane Heller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1998

"A modern spin on a good old-fashioned Cinderella story."
More frivolous, flaky fun (Princess Charming, p. 160, etc.) from Heller, who's quickly becoming the master of the slick urban modern woman's getaway romance . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 22, 1991

"Backed by only cursory analysis and little documentation, Cetron and Davies's guesses—sometimes thrilling, sometimes chilling—are, in the end, only as good as anyone's."
Not wholly convincing predictions of how the globe will coalesce into the ``New World Order,'' in which nations will ``cede sovereignty for the global good,'' resulting in interlocked trade for North America, Europe, and the Pacific Rim, and likely starvation for those Third World nations with nothing left to sell. Read full book review >