Search Results: "D. James Smith"


BOOK REVIEW

SMITH by Leon Garfield
Released: Sept. 1, 1967

"More Hogarth than Cruikshank, this lacks the gusto of Devil in the Fog (1966) but readers who respond to the author will follow him here."
"Smith. 'unted, 'ounded, 'omeless, and part gin-sodder. Smith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"Full of homespun philosophy and advice, this leisurely told tale may appeal to readers who have enjoyed the work of Brian Doyle. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
Sixth-grader Paolo describes what happens when his ten-year-old cousin Billy falls in love with Veronica, a Chinese-American girl, against community mores in central California in 1951. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAST COMPANY by D. James Smith
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"The passages of remarkably poised, fluid writing make Smith's debut, despite its disheartening message, unusually strong. (Fiction. 12-14)"
A depressing, downbeat tale that attempts to make sense of the lives of some highly dysfunctional, unlikable people, but never quite succeeds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Engaging light reading, but not world class. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Twelve-year-old Paolo is not ready for a real job or a girlfriend but he gets both—a paper route, shared with his brother and cousin, and romance, when his friend Theresa volunteers to help him look for the dog-napped family pet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOYS OF SAN JOAQUIN by D. James Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Set in the early 1950s, this upbeat tale offers a strong sense of place, plenty of growing-up and enough spirited characters to justify Paolo's opening, enticingly annotated, cast of characters. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Smith invites readers to travel an even Longer Way from Chicago with this summertime, old-time, small-town slice-of-life, as viewed by a hilariously matter-of-fact young resident. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BROTHER’S PASSION by D. James Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A dreamlike portrait done with a masterfully light hand: Smith (the YA novel Fast Company) moves us without crossing over into melodrama or the sentimental."
A lyrical novel of rural California about a young Vietnam vet's tragic unrequited love for a local girl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGGIE SMITH by Michael Coveney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"An authoritative and perceptive portrait."
The illustrious career of "a great stage actress in both comedy and tragedy, and an international film star." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATTI SMITH by Victor Bockris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"But she and her many fans deserve better than this sometimes sensationalistic, second-hand account of her life."
Lou Reed and Keith Richards biographer Bockris offers the first full-length portrait of —70s rock icon Patti Smith, a woman whose charismatic live shows and uncompromising music earned her the moniker "The High Priestess of Punk." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDERELLA SMITH by Stephanie Barden
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 2011

"Though the first-person narration sounds a little too close to the voice of Sara Pennypacker's Clementine, the richness of this new friendship and the gentle resolution will make readers hope for another installment. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Cinderella Smith cannot keep track of her shoes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPH SMITH by Richard Lyman Bushman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2005

"More complete but less evenhanded than Robert Remini's Joseph Smith (2002); some readers may find parts of Bushman's narrative to be overly credulous."
Orthodox life of the decidedly unorthodox Joseph Smith, founder and prophet of Mormonism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEVIE SMITH by Frances Spalding
Released: May 29, 1989

From the author of Vanessa Bell: A Bloomsbury Portrait (1983), a comprehensive look at the life and literary work of Stevie Smith (1902-1971)—whose unorthodox, sometimes humorous, deceptively deep poetry won her acclaim throughout England and entree into intellectual society even as she continued to work as a secretary and live in an unfashionable London suburb. Read full book review >