Search Results: "D.H. Figueredo"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ROAD TO SANTIAGO by D.H. Figueredo
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"It also adds to the always sparsely filled shelf of first-rate multicultural Christmas tales. (Spanish words are explained within the text as well as in a glossary, which unfortunately gives incorrect accentuations for a few words.) (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Based on an incident from the author's childhood, Figueredo's story takes place one Nochebuena (Christmas Eve) in the 1950s, after Castro's revolution has begun in Cuba. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Acute and absorbing scholarship. (Fifty b&w photographs—not seen.)"
First installment of an ambitious three-volume biography of D.H. Lawrence; to be followed by volume two (1912-1922, by Mark Kinkead-Weekes) and volume three (1922-1930, by David Ellis), set for 1992 and 1994, respectively. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 16, 1966

"Gathered largely from manuscripts now in American libraries, they appear here without introduction or preface, but the publishers will provide extensive jacket copy."
This volume, companion to the Complete Poems and the Letters, for the first time collects the complete playwriting of D.H. Lawrence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"A perceptive, readable work of Laurentiana, though perhaps too late in its own right."
Well-crafted life of the once-famous (or infamous) writer who got much mileage out of shocking the bourgeoisie. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"She tells it judiciously and well."
Maddox (Nora, 1988) focuses on Lawrence's tumultuous union with a German aristocrat as the major factor goading him to his artistic quantum leaps. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 30, 1980

"But adventurous readers will find engaging kernels here: the fuel pellets that keep the Miller engine anxiously going, afraid to stop, piling page upon page to convince someone or other—probably himself."
Begun in the Thirties (upon the urgings of Miller's Paris publisher, who thought a work of criticism might cement the serious-artist reputation of "pornographer" Miller) and worked on fitfully thereafter until finally abandoned, this paean to D. H. Lawrence is a passionate mess—a surge of homage to the one modern artist whom the young Miller saw as being an "Apostle of Day" as opposed to such "slaves of Night" as Proust and Joyce (and their art-above-life esthetic). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORMWOOD by D.H. Nevins
Released: Sept. 20, 2011

"Though it begins as a byproduct of vampire romance for teens, Nevins' novel dives into a journey befitting its laudable female protagonist—a novel that happily approaches its religious overtone with zeal and no reservations."
Love, catastrophe and angels at war, all in the face of Armageddon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SONS AND LOVERS by D.H. Lawrence
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 1992

"Example: 'He could smell her faint perfume' returns to its original, 'He could smell her faint natural perfume, and it drove him wild with hunger."
When Sons and Lovers was first seen by its reading public in 1913, its publishers had in fact, out of caution and timidity, shortened Lawrence's originally submitted version by about ten percent—cuts that are restored in this new "uncensored and uncut" edition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Chamelea by D.H. Robbins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 19, 2015

"A gripping, authentic-feeling psychological drama of dark sexual identities."
A psychological horror novel centered on a reverend who's also a twisted killer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDGE OF THE TRIANGLE by D.H. Cook
Released: March 10, 2011

"A hit-and-miss tale of souring American dreams, this subtle, affecting take on the travails of immigrant strivers turns cartoonish and contrived when those strivers bootstrap into wealth and power."
The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire anchors a generations-long family tragedy in this brooding historical melodrama. Read full book review >