Search Results: "D.M. Greenwood"


BOOK REVIEW

UNHOLY GHOSTS by D.M. Greenwood
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Distinctive, subtle flavors here—but not everyone's cup of tea."
Deaconess Theodora Braithwaite's second venture as unofficial sleuth (Clerical Errors). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLERICAL ERRORS by D.M. Greenwood
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 24, 1992

"Her further work is anticipated with pleasure and interest."
A debut novel set in a Church of England diocese centered on Medewich Cathedral and its adjacent living-and-working quarters for bishop, deacon, archdeacon, and their functionaries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBIN HOOD IN THE GREENWOOD by Jane Louise Curry
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Curry expertly captures the tone of traditional versions in this vigorous, good-humored rendition. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction/folklore. 8-10)"
Continuing the tale begun in Robin Hood and His Merry Men (1994, not reviewed), Curry introduces Friar Tuck and Marian by having both of them battle Robin to a draw, sends the merry men out to trick and frustrate the Sheriff of Nottingham repeatedly, and brings Robin and the king (Richard, presumably, though he's never named) together. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Expired Listings by D.M. Barr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 27, 2016

"A buoyant, commendable mystery that piles on red herrings with ferocity and glee."
In this debut thriller, a woman decides to look into the murders of fellow real estate brokers when it seems that someone's setting her up as a patsy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANATHEMA by D.M. Ross
Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"An attractive package whose contents are too brief and cryptic to register."
A tiny volume (2 & 5/8 inches by 3 & 3/4 inches) purporting to offer "a complete understanding of everything." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION by D.M. Thomas
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Skip it."
Thomas (The White Hotel, 1981, etc.) is an expert recycler, doing his best to keep the literary environment clean of any especially fresh idea or slant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAMPLIGHTER by D.M. Cornish
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2008

Cornish again buries a likable protagonist and perfectly viable plot under a mountain of obscure words and pretentious prose in this overweight sequel (Foundling, 2006). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOUNDLING by D.M. Cornish
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2006

"Fine story and universe, but overblown, especially the 100-page glossary and largely unnecessary appendices. (maps, metric conversion table, sketches, glossary, appendices) (Fantasy. 10-14)"
This epic fantasy, though solidly based in classic form (lonely orphan may secretly be someone special), flounders under cluttered writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAGE AGAINST SOCIETY by D.M. Hucks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 2016

"A truly strange and lengthy vision of a dystopian America."
Hucks offers a debut novel set in an authoritarian, future United States that takes drastic measures to battle juvenile delinquency. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FACTOTUM by D.M. Cornish
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"Readers new to the series should start with the first volume; fans will be more than satisfied. (Fantasy. 12-15, adult)"
Cornish finishes off his Foundling's Tale trilogy (originally dubbed Monster Blood Tattoo) while repeatedly coming perilously close to finishing off his central characters in a riveting string of brangles with bogles and even more vicious human foes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROLLER BABES by D.M. Bordner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 2005

"A heartfelt, engaging ride."
A tenement girl from the Bronx skates her way to become the queen of the roller derby. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LADY WITH A LAPTOP by D.M. Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1996

"A near-miss."
Thomas (Pictures at an Exhibition, 1993; Eating Pavlova, 1994, etc.) treats us to another trashy feast of cheap sensation and obvious sentiment, in the course of which—imperceptibly at first and against every expectation—he nearly manages to extract the rabbit from his hat. Read full book review >