Search Results: "DC Brod"


BOOK REVIEW

GETTING LUCKY by DC Brod
Released: Dec. 1, 2011

"A plucky heroine (Getting Sassy, 2010, etc.), her carping momma and her possibly permanent boyfriend, if they can resolve the kids/no kids issue, are more compelling than the environmental brouhaha. But that sting maneuver is top-drawer."
A scoop becomes an obituary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRAP KINGDOM by DC Pierson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 7, 2013

"Adults might wonder what Pierson's smoking; teens will just enjoy the ride. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Tom Parking dreamed of being whisked away to a fantasy realm, but his real life just wasn't crappy enough. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MISSING BATMOBILE by DC Comics
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A pretty good start for little readers dipping their toes into the world of DC Comics. (Board book. 1-3)"
The superfriends battle the Joker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIRL POWER! by DC Comics
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A decent introduction to the characters, but diversity remains a problem. And give Supergirl some pants! (Board book. 2-3)"
DC Comics' superwomen fight the good fight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY WHO COULDN’T SLEEP AND NEVER HAD TO by DC Pierson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Is it a teen-angst novel? Sci-fi? Funny as hell? All of those things and more."
Inspired first novel about a high-school misfit who freaks out when he discovers his best friend has an extraordinary gift. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 6, 2012

"For fans and students of popular sociology, an eclectic and pithy confirmation that many colorful heroes who speak in balloons are, indeed, Jewish."
How comic books' awesome superheroes stormed the mainstream without forsaking their distinctive ethnic character. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROTHERS IN BLOOD by D.C. Brod
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"As puzzles go: only so-so—too many melodramatic family secrets clutter the plot."
A fourth outing for Illinois p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAID IN FULL by D.C. Brod
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Quint's and Elaine's relationship has all the drama, pathos, and allure of a country-western song, but they need a less congested plot to mosey around in."
After a seven-year hiatus (Brothers in Blood, 1993), Brod resurrects her romance-impaired Illinois p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MASQUERADE IN BLUE by D.C. Brod
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 30, 1991

"Sturdy, carefully worked-out plot, with clever twists, believable motives, and a bittersweet romance between Quint and sometime-girlfriend Elaine."
In order to get a claustrophobic reporter friend out of jail (he refuses to divulge sources, etc.), rugged p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOCH MACHINE by Brod Bagert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Jean Marzollo's Pretend You're A Cat (1990), the acting-out potential seems indirect at best. (Poetry. 7-9)"
In these ``Poems for Children to Perform,'' young readers may first elect to scratch their heads: ``Alien Eyes?'' is about looking into another planet's sky; ``The Homework Guarantee'' covers procrastination; and ``Butterfly Fire'' trumpets something about ``the flame of poet-fire/When it burns in children's eyes.'' Budding dramatists can take hints from the chubby-face children who cavort through Ellis's sprawling cartoon scenes; these are usually light in mood, although the image of a man sweating over his taxes is a dismal take on ``Dad's Greatest Fear''—``that someday/I'll grow up just like him.'' Bagert's occasional proficiency, as in ``The Food Cheer''—``Carnivores! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIANT CHILDREN by Brod Bagert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Both the poetry and the artwork conspire to make this piece enormously entertaining and rich with wicked humor. (Poetry. 4-8)"
Bagert's (Rainbows, Head Lice, and Pea Green Tile, not reviewed, etc.) collection of children's poetry is a devilishly funny lot that connects to situations familiar to all young readers, the ones the classroom hamster believes to be giants. Read full book review >