Search Results: "Dallas Middaugh"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CITY OF EMBER by Jeanne DuPrau
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2012

"No substitute for the original, but an agreeable alternative for younger or less-able readers. (Graphic science fiction. 8-10)"
Effective use of light and shadow in the art give this graphic adaptation of the 2003 novel a properly spooky look, but it reads overall more like a summary than a developed story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LILY THE UNICORN by Dallas Clayton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 22, 2014

"All will agree: Lily is lovely. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Readers first see Lily the unicorn, a picture of exuberance in pink and blue, bounding across a field of flowers. She has energy and enthusiasm for many activities and friends—doesn't everyone? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAKE MAGIC! DO GOOD! by Dallas Clayton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 13, 2012

"Let the effervescence in the pictures leaven the didacticism of the poems. (Poetry. 6-10)"
Indie best-seller Clayton (An Awesome Book!, 2012) offers this light collection of didactic verse for young readers as his traditional-publishing debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN AWESOME BOOK! by Dallas Clayton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"Share with your kid, or lay it on a new grad or parental unit for some literary feel-good action. (Picture book. 6-8, adult)"
An earnest invitation to dream big, dude, and then bigger yet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUSH LIFE by Dallas Murphy
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Ross Thomas had better watch his back."
A wild, winsome new adventure starts for Artie Deemer (Lover Man, 1987) when he falls for pool-shark Crystal Spivey, whose obnoxious husband, Trammel Weems, promptly turns up dead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALLEN WOMEN by Sandra Dallas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 22, 2013

"A lightweight, innocuous narrative. For many readers, the resolution (when it finally comes) will be no great shock. Still, not a bad choice for a lazy, low-key weekend."
Murdered prostitutes, unsavory characters and high society provide fodder for scandal sheets—and for author Dallas (True Sisters, 2012, etc.)—in 1885 Denver. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRIVE LIKE HELL by Dallas Hudgens
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 8, 2005

"A giddy homage to testosterone-induced blindness: Hudgens's first is so much fun that it's easy to forget how difficult it is to portray decent people acting like morons with an artfulness sufficient to transform it into boneheaded genius."
Cars and the damage a man, with them, can do to himself, his women, and his good name lie at the center of this deceptively funny—okay, hilarious—coming-of-legal-incarceration-ager. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A QUILT FOR CHRISTMAS by Sandra Dallas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Elegant, thought-provoking and quietly powerful."
A Union soldier's wife wonders what happened to the quilt she sent him for Christmas, even as she adjusts to widowhood and creates a new life with other women touched by war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

1918: WAR AND PEACE by Gregor Dallas
NON-FICTION
Released: May 24, 2001

"Popular history at its best: a narrative with attitude—thoroughly researched, gracefully written. Possibly a classic. (62 b&w photographs, 4 maps)"
A sweeping, swirling history of the end of WWI and the ensuing struggle for peace—and of the inadvertent and ineluctable construction of the foundation of WWII. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2008

"Bravely drawn popular history: thoroughly researched, muscular with details and rendered in enchanting prose."
Seasoned historian Dallas (1945: The War That Never Ended, 2005, etc.) serves up exquisite slices of Parisian lore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRUE SISTERS by Sandra Dallas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 24, 2012

"This fact-based historical fiction, celebrating sisterhood and heroism, makes for a surefire winner."
A calamitous chapter in American history is illustrated by the intertwined tales of four women who survived it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PERSIAN PICKLE CLUB by Sandra Dallas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A milder version of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe, with more predictable twists and less engaging eccentricities. (First serial rights to Good Housekeeping; Literary Guild alternate selection)"
The author of Buster Midnight's Cafe (1990) spins a tale of pioneer justice and impenetrable loyalty among farmwives in Depression-era Kansas: a down-to-earth, genuine, and, alas, dull second novel. ``Persian pickle,'' the Kansas term for paisley, has lent its name to the decades-old Harveyville quilting club in recognition of founding member Ceres Root's old habitparceling out bits of her favorite paisley fabric for use in other club members' quilts. Read full book review >