Search Results: "Damien Lewis"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 10, 2014

"Books on dogs who served in war make up a minor genre. This account will appeal to dog lovers and history buffs who can tolerate the florid novelization and fictionalized dialogue."
An enthusiastic dual biography of a man and his wartime animal companion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 13, 2011

"A unique testimonial from today's professional, highly specialized military, with a clear extra appeal to animal lovers."
Straightforward telling of an unusual wartime narrative: the reintroduction of the Marines' Military Working Dog (MWD) teams to frontline combat for the first time since Vietnam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 2011

"A moving message from a courageous humanitarian, and more timely than ever."
"For the cost of one [American] bombing run," the author writes in this hard-hitting debut memoir, "I doubtless could have fed and clothed and cared for those 100,000 displaced Afghan refugees. For the cost of another…I likely could have educated their children." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Both heartrending and chilling."
Eyewitness account of the systematic genocide inflicted on the black African tribes of Darfur province by Sudan's Arab government. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 13, 2014

"While the book will appeal mostly to military history and combat tale buffs, the story is suspenseful and well-written enough for a wider audience to enjoy."
Journalist Lewis (co-author: Sergeant Rex: The Unbreakable Bond Between a Marine and His Military Working Dog, 2011, etc.) highlights the soldier's point of view in a tale from the front lines in Iraq. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLAVE by Mende Nazer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"Revelatory in the truest sense of the word: told with a child-pure candor that comes like a bucket of cold water in the lap."
The shockingly grim story of how the author became a slave at the end of the 20th century—mercifully, it has an ending to lift the spirit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHEMISTRY by Damien Wilkins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Attempting to straddle the line between themes of family and addiction, the author misses both in the process."
Fourth novel from Wilkins (Little Masters, 1997, etc.), about a family that can't seem to extricate itself from drugs, legal or illegal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Amanojaku by Damien Lutz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 18, 2016

"A multilayered protagonist and stellar setting help guide this sci-fi narrative to an unforgettable coda."
In 2040, a former convict with an implant to stave off violent impulses finds himself in the midst of a plan to take down a corporate empire in Lutz's (Book Hunter, 2015, etc.) sci-fi thriller.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MISERABLES by Damien Wilkins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Wilkins's novel is all interior, no edge, and the interior is a dull one."
The death of his grandfather spurs a young editor to reevaluate his life—in this brooding, introspective first novel from New Zealander Wilkins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE MASTERS by Damien Wilkins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Rich with shading and detail, but too loosely organized for its own good: a crowded canvas that badly wants some focal point."
A meandering account of life among disaffected expatriates that ultimately overstays its visa: a second novel from New Zealander Wilkins (The Miserables, 1993) All the usual confusions that plague young people are prominent among Wilkins's brood, none of whom seems much more adult than the children who have somehow fallen into their care. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GODPLAYERS by Damien Broderick
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 3, 2005

Multiple-universe jaunt from the author of Transcension (2001), etc. Read full book review >