Search Results: "Dan Savage"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"'There are millions of ethical, fully moral sinners in America,' says he. Thank heavens."
As he strides proudly through Gomorrah—be that New York City or Dubuque—The Stranger editor Savage (The Kid, 1999) sings the praises of American freedom and American sinners, and sends a little "bitch slap" across the righteous cheeks of Messrs. Bork, Bennett, and Buchanan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Energetically ambivalent memoir of a gay wedding as a family milestone. Despite his arguments to the contrary, Savage takes a resigned pleasure making an honest family man of himself."
Seattle sex-columnist Savage (The Kid, 1999, etc.) has found the man of his dreams and adopted a baby. According to his mother, he's finally ready to get married. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN SAVAGE by Dan Savage
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 28, 2013

"At turns serious and humorous, this multifaceted collection of essays will entertain both longtime Savage fans and new readers."
Personal and political essays from the columnist and gay rights advocate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 13, 1999

"A book of humor and heart and a vision of life lived fully, Savage paints a picture of an ideal home for his and his boyfriend's child in its blemished humanity and right-on queerness; it's a book that can't be put down for the same reasons."
Savage's memoir of his experience with adoption reveals an acid tongue and a boundless heart, a savvy blending of social commentary and self-deprecating humor, with an ending so sentimental that, in comparison to the beatific vision of Daddies Dan and Terry, June and Ward Cleaver would look like Al and Peg Bundy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN SEX WRITING 2004 by Dan Savage
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Technology-enslaved, boring, all-American: this is pretty dispiriting stuff. Thank goodness Erica Jong is there to remind readers, in closing, that 'wild passionate sex exists.' Even without a credit card and a mouse."

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE'S WALRUS? by Stephen  Savage
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Refreshing, captivating, elegant and witty. (Picture book. 3-7)"
It's another slow day at the zoo—not. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE TUG by Stephen  Savage
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Though this cute-but-mighty tug's strengths are oddly undercut by the syrupy gear-switch at the end, the bright, attractive pictures will appeal to boat-loving toddlers. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Graphically spiffy and textually brief, this exploration of an anthropomorphic harbor tugboat's working role tacks on a maudlin shtick in the final quarter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LASER MOOSE AND RABBIT BOY by Doug Savage
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"With rampant whimsy and cheerful silliness, expect this to hit funny bones with laser accuracy. (Graphic science fiction. 7-11)"
A moose that can shoot laser beams out his eyes—what could be better? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPERTRUCK by Stephen  Savage
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"A serious treat for truck lovers. (Picture book. 2-6)"
When a blizzard stops the mighty trucks of the city from working, it's Supertruck to the rescue! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE'S WALRUS? AND PENGUIN? by Stephen  Savage
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Clever, cheeky, and endearing—a wordless achievement. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Walrus escapes again, this time with pal Penguin, but their day on the town takes an unexpected turn for the fun-loving pinniped of Where's Walrus? (2011). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE PLANE LEARNS TO WRITE by Stephen  Savage
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 6, 2017

"A well-designed winner for ambitious little pilots. (Picture book. 3-5)"
At flight school, Little Plane learns skywriting by practicing "arcs, dives, and loopity-loops." But the last present a particular problem for him, as the circling maneuver makes him dizzy. Read full book review >