Search Results: "Daniel A. Pollen"


BOOK REVIEW

POLLEN by Jeff Noon
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Intriguingly textured, reliably witty and inventive: Despite an end that trails off disappointingly into mythological maundering, Noon's whirling, purposeful insanity packs quite a wallop."
That welcome rarity, a science fiction sequel that surpasses its original (Vurt, 1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL FINDS A POEM by Micha Archer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A vividly illustrated, inventively told opportunity for early readers to grasp the power of language to observe, entertain, and mystify. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Collage illustrations offer early readers an introduction to the beauty of poetry through the warmhearted relationships between a young boy and the friendly animals in his local park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1993

"Eleven illustrations—not seen)."
High technology and human tragedy; luck and persistence; altruism and competition—they all come together in this absorbing tale of medical detection that spans decades and crosses continents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Clearly written, chronologically organized and making good use of archival photographs and reproductions of other important documents, this is a solid introduction to an historical figure who deserves to be better known. (timeline, author's note, resources) (Biography. 8-12)"
Daniel A. Payne may have only been five feet tall and 100 pounds, but "the little bishop left giant footprints." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL by Henning Mankell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"An ambitious, flawed but compelling addition to the Mankell canon."
A haunting novel by the Swedish mystery master, one that proceeds from the indelible to the inscrutable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PICTURE BOOK OF DANIEL BOONE  by David A. Adler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 15, 2013

"The informational text proves why Daniel Boone is synonymous with the pioneer spirit. (Picture book/biography. 4-8)"
Adler, collaborating with his son, expands his extensive repertoire of picture-book biographies of famous Americans with this worthy addition featuring Daniel Boone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Allowing for characteristic poetic license, the reader finishes Hughes's best pieces with a renewed understanding of poetryand a rekindled passion for it."
With as much myth-making as metrical analysis, poet Hughes's diverse pieceswhether on Shakespeare, Sylvia Plath, war poetry, or Norse mythscohere into a provocative, bewitched view of poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 1992

"An intriguing study of a central figure in the American imagination. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Daniel Boone's name has been synonymous with the American frontier ever since a highly colored narrative of his exploits appeared in John Filson's Kentucke (1784)—when Boone was still alive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"And perhaps they won't, as an intriguing Epilogue and coy Author's Note slyly suggest. Long may the Moosepath League flourish."
Reid's expert appropriation of the benign world of Charles Dickens continues in this third volume of his richly entertaining saga (Cordelia Underwood, 1998; Mollie Peer, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL WEBSTER by Robert V. Remini
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 6, 1997

"Though Remini's obvious admiration for Webster may sometimes cloud his view, a more complete and engrossing biography could not be produced. (photos, not seen)"
This massive biography leaves no stone unturned in portraying a familiar but little-studied antebellum figure, considered the young country's best orator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL MARTIN by John Fowles
Released: Sept. 12, 1977

"The surprise is that he has chosen to burden his realest, smallest story with the unlikely job of explaining—and finding hope in—Twentieth-Century Life."
A writer and his women ("his past futures, his future pasts")—and an attempt to discover "what had gone wrong not only with Daniel Martin, but his generation, age, century. . . ." Read full book review >