Search Results: "Daniel Joseph Singal"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 25, 1997

"Written with calm authority and offering a plausible new thesis, this is a worthwhile introduction to the next century of Faulkner."
In this persuasive intellectual biography, Singal makes sense of Faulkner's thought by viewing him as caught between the cultures of the Victorian and Modernist eras. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1965

"Perspicacious, pertinent."
This is a book about Vietnam, and for straight, readable reportage, it is beyond doubt the best so far: It is also a book about reporting, specifically the difficulties involved in reporting on so confusing and misunderstood a story as Vietnam has been for so long. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 4, 1998

"Prediction: This will become a more important book than it really deserves to be."
The hyperbole of the subtitle tells the story: It's a close call whether this volume provides a brilliant overview of the big picture or overgeneralized clichÇs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CRYSTAL HEART by Aaron Shepard
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"For his first picture book, Fiedler produces exquisite artwork; the landscapes are magically transporting, while the lustrous colors radiate an antique, spiritual quality. (Picture book/folklore. 6-9)"
High in her lonely tower, a mandarin's daughter, Mi Nuong, gazes through a crescent window. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBOT UPRISINGS by Daniel H. Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 2014

"Philip K. Dick would be proud, in any event. You'll never look at your Roomba the same way again."
Fun fact: According to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, as of 2010 there were 8.6 million robots in the world. Fun scenario: They're all out to kill us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRESS START TO PLAY by Daniel H. Wilson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A mixed bag, like many anthologies, but sci-fi fans will find it well worth their while."
An anthology that examines the relationship between video games and storytelling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HATSHEPSUT, HIS MAJESTY, HERSELF by Catherine M. Andronik
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 2001

"Younger students of Ancient Egypt and women's history alike will find this careful, but not stuffy, study worthwhile, and the closing bibliography of fiction and nonfiction provides some intriguing follow-up reading. (Biography. 8-11)"
Thanks to the strenuous efforts of her successor, Tuthmosis III, to eliminate all evidence of her 15th-century b.c.e. reign, the historical record is particularly spotty for Hatshepsut, the most successful of the few women who became rulers of ancient Egypt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"There are many stories in this volume that would make interesting history for the young reader; too bad they are sloppily combined into one choppy offering. (timeline, Web sites) (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
The McKissacks tell the story of the first African-Americans in America in an addition to the Milestone Books series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUAN VERDADES by Joe Hayes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

As Hayes (El Cucuy!, not reviewed, etc.) explains in his author's note, he has revised a variant of Aarne-Thompson's tale type 889, "The Faithful Servant," drawing on versions collected in Spain and New Mexico. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

JOSEPH KANON
by Clayton Moore

In an age when America’s intelligence services aren’t always portrayed in the best light, Joseph Kanon’s new novel about the Cold War seems starkly elegant by comparison. In our starred review, Kirkus says of Defectors, “...not since Le Carré’s A Perfect Spy has there been a family of spooks to rival this one.”

The novel is an intimate ...


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BLOG POST

JOSEPH SCAPELLATO
by Richard Z. Santos

Joseph Scapellato isn’t from the west—he grew up in suburban Chicago—but like so many Americans, the mythic west was always nearby.  “My mom was and is an enormous fan of golden age Westerns: Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, all those dudes in white hats,” Scapellato says. “I grew up watching those, and she accumulated all these cowboy tchotchkes. I grew ...


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BLOG POST

DANIEL LOWE
by Megan Labrise

A few months shy of his 60th birthday, Daniel Lowe’s publishing dreams came true—with a novel that proceeds from a nightmarish premise.

In All That’s Left to Tell, a mid-level American executive named Marc Laurent is held captive in Pakistan by two local guards. Each day he is blindfolded and an English-speaking woman, who identifies herself as “Josephine,” questions ...


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