Search Results: "Daniel L. Everett"


BOOK REVIEW

LANGUAGE by Daniel L.  Everett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 13, 2012

"Readers' eyes will sometimes sparkle with new insight, sometimes glaze at the dense exposition."
Everett (Dean of Arts and Sciences/Bentley Univ.; Don't Sleep, There Are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazon Jungle, 2008, etc.) challenges Noam Chomsky, arguing that grammar and language are learned. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW LANGUAGE BEGAN by Daniel L.  Everett
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 2017

"A worthy book for general readers not well-versed in anthropology, neurology, linguistics, and other technical sciences."
A noted linguist explores "the evolutionary history of language as a human invention—from the emergence of our species to the more than 7,000 languages spoken today." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 11, 2008

"Despite his understated style, Everett's experiences and findings fairly explode from these pages and will reverberate in the minds of readers."
Rich account of fieldwork among a tribe of hunter-gatherers in Brazil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL by Henning Mankell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"An ambitious, flawed but compelling addition to the Mankell canon."
A haunting novel by the Swedish mystery master, one that proceeds from the indelible to the inscrutable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUPERT EVERETT by Rupert Everett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 2, 2007

"The funny, unromantic side of an actor's life: eternally unfulfilled, vacillating between giggly highs and malicious lows."
The English actor dishes on fame, lack of fame and his peripatetic quest for a film project that isn't a complete disaster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 1992

"An intriguing study of a central figure in the American imagination. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Daniel Boone's name has been synonymous with the American frontier ever since a highly colored narrative of his exploits appeared in John Filson's Kentucke (1784)—when Boone was still alive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"And perhaps they won't, as an intriguing Epilogue and coy Author's Note slyly suggest. Long may the Moosepath League flourish."
Reid's expert appropriation of the benign world of Charles Dickens continues in this third volume of his richly entertaining saga (Cordelia Underwood, 1998; Mollie Peer, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL WEBSTER by Robert V. Remini
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 6, 1997

"Though Remini's obvious admiration for Webster may sometimes cloud his view, a more complete and engrossing biography could not be produced. (photos, not seen)"
This massive biography leaves no stone unturned in portraying a familiar but little-studied antebellum figure, considered the young country's best orator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL MARTIN by John Fowles
Released: Sept. 12, 1977

"The surprise is that he has chosen to burden his realest, smallest story with the unlikely job of explaining—and finding hope in—Twentieth-Century Life."
A writer and his women ("his past futures, his future pasts")—and an attempt to discover "what had gone wrong not only with Daniel Martin, but his generation, age, century. . . ." Read full book review >