Search Results: "Daniel Pennac"


BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL by Henning Mankell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"An ambitious, flawed but compelling addition to the Mankell canon."
A haunting novel by the Swedish mystery master, one that proceeds from the indelible to the inscrutable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SCAPEGOAT by Daniel Pennac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 19, 1998

"The first of Ben's four adventures to be published in the US is very French and more than a little precious, with clownish Ben, like Jacques Tati's M. Hulot, a charmingly jittery guide to the mercantile postmodern."
Benjamin Malaussäne's official job title is Quality Controller, but since nobody could possibly control the quality of all the goods in his Parisian department store, his real vocation is to serve as a scapegoat who can absorb outraged customers' abuse in a manner so pathetically affecting that the customers withdraw their complaints. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BETTER THAN LIFE by Daniel Pennac
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

This ode to the joys of reading is itself no joy to read. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PASSION FRUIT by Daniel Pennac
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Pennac's gift for charmingly nonstop non sequitur makes this featherlight case less like most English-language crime fiction than like the comic-strip film farces of Pedro Almodóvar."
Life would be perfect for Benjamin Malaussène (The Scapegoat, 1998)—who, just fired from his job at Vendetta Press, is free to resume his unofficial status as professional scapegoat—if it weren't for the new man in his fortune-teller sister Thérèse's life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG by Daniel Pennac
by Daniel Pennac, translated by Sarah Adams
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Occasionally surreal and slightly existential, this well-written piece has an unusual flavor. (Fiction. 8-12)"
What seems at first like a simple, elegant dog's-eye-view uncurls into a dark-edged musing on hurt feelings, death, despair, and the problematic relationship between humans and dogs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 1992

"An intriguing study of a central figure in the American imagination. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Daniel Boone's name has been synonymous with the American frontier ever since a highly colored narrative of his exploits appeared in John Filson's Kentucke (1784)—when Boone was still alive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"And perhaps they won't, as an intriguing Epilogue and coy Author's Note slyly suggest. Long may the Moosepath League flourish."
Reid's expert appropriation of the benign world of Charles Dickens continues in this third volume of his richly entertaining saga (Cordelia Underwood, 1998; Mollie Peer, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL WEBSTER by Robert V. Remini
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 6, 1997

"Though Remini's obvious admiration for Webster may sometimes cloud his view, a more complete and engrossing biography could not be produced. (photos, not seen)"
This massive biography leaves no stone unturned in portraying a familiar but little-studied antebellum figure, considered the young country's best orator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL MARTIN by John Fowles
Released: Sept. 12, 1977

"The surprise is that he has chosen to burden his realest, smallest story with the unlikely job of explaining—and finding hope in—Twentieth-Century Life."
A writer and his women ("his past futures, his future pasts")—and an attempt to discover "what had gone wrong not only with Daniel Martin, but his generation, age, century. . . ." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

King Daniel by Susan Wolf Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 2016

"A gripping tale of a missing patriarch in 1970s Florida; an auspicious debut."
The disappearance of a Tampa Bay blue blood rattles the skeletons in his family's closet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL DINOSAUR by Daryl K. Cobb
Released: Dec. 22, 2012

"A sweet story told in simple rhymes that young children would likely enjoy."
Cobb and Castagno's cute, colorful picture book illustrates the bond between a brother and sister. Read full book review >