Search Results: "Daniel Pool"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

"Great Books meets celebrity gossip: a rare, literate entertainment. (illustrations, not seen)"
Another informal, delightfully entertaining foray into the world of the Victorian novel by the author of What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 7, 1993

"Superficial but charming—in effect, a handbook on how to live as if one were a character in a 19th-century English novel."
An eccentric collection of brief essays (plus a glossary) that explains not the facts but the fictions of English life, as they were represented by writers such as Hardy, Trollope, Dickens, and Jane Austen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 27, 1994

"Pool captures the resourcefulness of the researchers, the voices of those who made the discoveries and tested them in their own lives."
Through shrewdly selected examples and engaging interviews with researchers, science journalist Pool (Science, Discover, Nature, etc.) assembles a convincing argument to explain the biological basis of sexual differences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Pool's overstated thesis trivializes an important topic. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A sensationalizing and deeply flawed work. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DANIEL LOWE
by Megan Labrise

A few months shy of his 60th birthday, Daniel Lowe’s publishing dreams came true—with a novel that proceeds from a nightmarish premise.

In All That’s Left to Tell, a mid-level American executive named Marc Laurent is held captive in Pakistan by two local guards. Each day he is blindfolded and an English-speaking woman, who identifies herself as “Josephine,” questions ...


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BOOK REVIEW

Catlorian II by R.L. Pool
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 10, 2017

"Colorful characters populate a lively and jam-packed ongoing saga."
In the follow-up to Pool's (Catlorian: Savon'el, 2016) fantasy debut, various bands of warriors try to thwart evil beings intent on destroying the world of Ta'el. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DANIEL ALARCÓN
by Richard Z. Santos

Daniel Alarcón was in a staff meeting at Columbia University, where he is an Assistant Professor in Broadcast Journalism, when friends started texting him congratulatory messages.

“I was totally surprised,” he says. “And I didn’t know what they were talking about.”

They were talking about Alarcón’s latest collection of short stories, The King Is Always Above the People ...


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BLOG POST

DANIEL SUAREZ
by Clayton Moore

Daniel Suarez finally made it to the future in his new novel, Change Agent, which Kirkus’ reviewer says is “...his most entertaining high-tech thriller yet.”

The author sometimes gets pegged as a science fiction author because his previous bestsellers—Daemon, Freedom, Kill Decision, and Influx—all revolve around technologies that are just around the corner. In Change Agent ...


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BLOG POST

7 STANDALONE SF/F SEQUELS THAT WILL MAKE YOU WANT TO READ THE WHOLE SERIES
by John DeNardo

Book series are a hallmark of science fiction and fantasy for a simple reason: readers love coming back to imaginative worlds they've enjoyed. At the same time, books that are part of a series could be a tough sell for readers who are new to the story. Here's a handful of new science fiction and fantasy sequels that ...


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BLOG POST

DANIEL MIYARES
by Megan Labrise

For author-illustrator Daniel Miyares, Langston Hughes’s “Dream Variation” (1926) was a revelation.

“To fling my arms wide / In some place of the sun, / To whirl and to dance / Till the white day is done,” begins Hughes’ famous poem, whose two stanzas juxtapose stark and hopeful versions of a day in the life of an African American in the early ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2007

"Some well-deserved pats on the back and slaps upside the head."
Freelance journalist and former Boston Review editor Pool (Other People's Mail, 2000) takes the pulse of the American book-reviewing profession and finds it weakening. Read full book review >