Search Results: "Daniel S. Hamermesh"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"HR representatives would be wise to consult the essential ethical discussion regarding the 'pure discrimination in favor of the good-looking and against the bad-looking' with which the author concludes his simultaneously fascinating and frustrating investigation."
An extensive, dizzying compilation of economic data explaining "why attractive people are more successful." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Sure not to please deans or development officers, Greenberg's heavy-handed but well-reasoned attack on the big-science machine merits attention."
A broad assault on the business of doing science in America, which, the author argues, prizes profit and professional advancement over knowledge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUSH, LITTLE ALIEN by Daniel S. Kirk
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"It's a bedtime journey as loving, if not quite as soporific, as the original. (Picture book. 3-5)"
PLB 0-7868-2469-7 Kirk (Bigger, 1998, etc.) spins out an extraterrestrial version of the familiar lullaby, featuring a four-armed father promising his banana-colored little one, among other prizes, a shooting star, an astronaut (against the astronaut's wishes, it appears), a laser rifle, tools to build a spaceship and, finally, a good-night kiss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWO-GUN COHEN by Daniel S. Levy
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 26, 1997

"A diverting tale of the life and crimes of a unique Old China Hand, intertwined with the story of modern China. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
Soon after the turn of the century a Jewish Cockney adventurer arrived in Canada, seeking his—or somebody's—fortune. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"The delivery is gentle, the message upbeat, the aftereffects nil: fizzy spiritual snacks that evanesce in memory."
In the Robert Fulghum tradition but without the Fulghum bite, 52 little essays on life's little wonders, by a rabbi from Westchester, New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PASSOVER ZOO SEDER by S. Daniel  Guttman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"Crude pen-and-crayon drawings add to the painful absurdity of this telling. (Picture book/religion. 5-8)"
How can Passover be celebrated at the zoo when the only Haggadah is too worn to read? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1970

"For the acculturated who will want a further expansion of this mind."
That nightcrawling grandmaster of inner space talking on tape about most of the trends he represents and has set: the new novel which will suggest multileveled experience; pornography (is there such a thing?); drugs; power; the general repulsiveness of the ordinary scene from which he is altogether disengaged; other writers (although he says he never heard of Wright Morris who called his Naked Lunch a hemorrhage of the imagination); words and imagery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 24, 2012

"Such a large historical project could have easily descended into tedious and dry academia, but instead, all three volumes are briskly paced, well-researched and insightful. Aficionados of urban histories, in particular, will find much to enjoy."
This ambitious three-volume history, overseen by Moore (Judaic Studies and History/Univ. of Michigan; American Jewish Identity Politics, 2008, etc.), provides a lively, much-needed overview of the role that Jews have played in the history and success of the Big Apple, helping to transform it into "a city of promises, some fulfilled, some pending, some beckoning new generations." Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DANIEL LOWE
by Megan Labrise

A few months shy of his 60th birthday, Daniel Lowe’s publishing dreams came true—with a novel that proceeds from a nightmarish premise.

In All That’s Left to Tell, a mid-level American executive named Marc Laurent is held captive in Pakistan by two local guards. Each day he is blindfolded and an English-speaking woman, who identifies herself as “Josephine,” questions ...


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BLOG POST

DANIEL SUAREZ
by Clayton Moore

Daniel Suarez finally made it to the future in his new novel, Change Agent, which Kirkus’ reviewer says is “...his most entertaining high-tech thriller yet.”

The author sometimes gets pegged as a science fiction author because his previous bestsellers—Daemon, Freedom, Kill Decision, and Influx—all revolve around technologies that are just around the corner. In Change Agent ...


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BOOK REVIEW

FLOAT by Daniel Miyares
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 9, 2015

"Lovely and life-affirming. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This wordless story, bookended by the creation of two iconic paper toys, follows a Latino boy through outdoor playtime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARDON ME! by Daniel Miyares
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 17, 2014

"For clever cautionary tales with a lingering bite, try those by Jon Scieszka, James Marshall or Jon Klassen. (Picture book. 4-7)"
"The Gingerbread Boy" meets "The Mitten" in this tale of a self-centered (and doomed) protagonist squawking about an increasingly crowded setting. Read full book review >