Search Results: "Daniel Woodrell"


BOOK REVIEW

TOMATO RED by Daniel Woodrell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 31, 1998

"Woodrell's sorry country folk —live fast— and —learn slow,— as Jamalee puts it, and their tale provides lots of low comedy—and no small amount of pathos."
Woodrell's second book, Woe to Live On (1987), is being filmed by Ang Lee, and the author seems to have pitched this, his sixth low-down and dirty novel, to the big screen: his no-account characters and their dumb-as-a-stump doings have that over-the-top quality that transfers neatly to the movies; and his downbeat ending, with its teenaged femme fatale, is pure Hollywood noir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ONES YOU DO by Daniel Woodrell
Released: April 16, 1992

"Characters as screwy and dangerous as any in Elmore Leonard, and a sense of pace and language that never warns you whether a scene or sentence will end in a burst of poetry or bullets."
When his songstress wife Randi Tripp, the 'Bama Butterfly, runs out on him with $47,000 he's been holding for Lunch Pumphrey, sodden patriarch John X. Shade takes off with his ten-year-old daughter Etta for St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEATH OF SWEET MISTER by Daniel Woodrell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 2001

"Such narration carries this novel—and it's a weighty, worthwhile load."
A long-suffering kid draws the bars of his own cage, in Woodrell's tender and downright merciless seventh novel (after Tomato Red, 1998). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINTER’S BONE by Daniel Woodrell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 2006

"Every bit as good as Woodrell's icy The Death of Sweet Mister (2001)—in other words, about as good as it gets."
A stoical Appalachian girl strives to rescue her family from her father's criminal legacy in Woodrell's bleak, mean, gripping eighth novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OUTLAW ALBUM by Daniel Woodrell
Released: Oct. 5, 2011

"Hard words and harsh trials from a writer who knows all too well the frozen ground he occupies."
Twelve spare, haunting and brutal slices of country noir from the genre's most gifted practitioner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAID'S VERSION by Daniel Woodrell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"A commanding fable about trespass and reconstruction from a titan of Southern fiction."
A grandson becomes obsessed with his grandmother's story about a small-town disaster from many years ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIVE US A KISS by Daniel Woodrell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

"That aside, Woodrell elbows his way to the forefront of tough-guy fiction and maybe even bestseller lists."
In his fifth novel full of ``quick, terrible rough-stuff,'' Woodrell (The Ones You Do, 1992, etc.) makes it clear he's itching to escape the confines of genre fiction: that, like his Ozark-bred novelist-protagonist, he's hoping for that breakout book. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DANIEL LOWE
by Megan Labrise

A few months shy of his 60th birthday, Daniel Lowe’s publishing dreams came true—with a novel that proceeds from a nightmarish premise.

In All That’s Left to Tell, a mid-level American executive named Marc Laurent is held captive in Pakistan by two local guards. Each day he is blindfolded and an English-speaking woman, who identifies herself as “Josephine,” questions ...


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BLOG POST

DANIEL SUAREZ
by Clayton Moore

Daniel Suarez finally made it to the future in his new novel, Change Agent, which Kirkus’ reviewer says is “...his most entertaining high-tech thriller yet.”

The author sometimes gets pegged as a science fiction author because his previous bestsellers—Daemon, Freedom, Kill Decision, and Influx—all revolve around technologies that are just around the corner. In Change Agent ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE THING ABOUT SPRING by Daniel Kirk
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 17, 2015

"Although the underlying idea is that resistance to change is normal—and acceptance of change is healthy—an easier sell would have been an animal who dreaded the cold and dark of winter. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Rabbit is apprehensive about winter turning to spring, and his friends Mouse, Bird and Bear help convince him that spring is equally wonderful. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETIMES I FEEL LIKE A FOX by Danielle Daniel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"This book will fascinate children expanding their horizons and learning about other cultures (or, in the case of Anishinaabe kids, their own). (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
An introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU ARE NOT MY FRIEND, BUT I MISS YOU by Daniel Kirk
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"There are no bad sock monkeys, not even the one or two who have forgotten themselves for a second. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A sock monkey goes to the dark side, or as dark as a sock monkey can get, in Kirk's dovelike tale of dawning self-awareness. Read full book review >