Search Results: "Danny Danziger"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 10, 1999

"Like a box of chocolates, it's appetizing fun without much nutritional value. (13 b&w illustrations) (Radio satellite tour)"
An amusing, though lightweight, examination of English life in the year 1000. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2004

"A reader-friendly glance at a turning point in history."
"No vill or man shall be forced to build bridges at river banks, except those who ought to do so by custom and law." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 25, 2007

"A delectable pleasure for Met devotees."
An entertaining peek behind the curtains—and the security cameras, and the interpretive signage, and the archival cases and winding basements—of Manhattan's famed house of culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 3, 1986

"Her audiences will not be disappointed."
This new novel by the popular Danziger features a heroine who lives in the year 2057 but whose problems will seem familiar to today's teens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMBER BROWN GOES FOURTH by Paula Danziger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 12, 1995

"Seasoned with puns and repartee, and leavened with a bit of insight, this easy chapter book is a thoroughly enjoyable read. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Now that her best friend has moved away, Amber (Amber Brown Is not a Crayon, 1994, etc.) is facing fourth grade and the difficulty of finding a new best friend in a class where everyone has already paired off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAMES DOESN'T RHYME WITH JAMES by Paula Danziger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"The YA equivalent of popcorn: After an hour, you'll forget you ever read it. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Teenage Kendra Kaye and her family fly to London for Christmas, where they'll see dreamboat Frank Lee, her family's summer house guest in New York in Remember Me to Harold Square (1987). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1989

"Not as deft, or as deep, as Byars, but sure to entertain."
Sixth-grader Matthew is the class tease; and some of his "jokes," like putting gum in a girl's long hair, are more mean than funny. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 4, 1987

"The author does communicate an upbeat, positive impression of life in the Big Apple, but it's a vague impression, from a single angle."
This lightweight, romantic teen novel floats atop a tour of New York City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARTH TO MATTHEW by Paula Danziger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"This third Matthew story stands alone, but will have readers asking for the others. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Completing sixth grade, Matthew notices that "everything is getting so complicated...everything around him is changing": older sister Amanda is hostile and rebellious; his parents appear publicly in weird costumes for his mother's message-delivery service. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIVORCE EXPRESS by Paula Danziger
Released: Oct. 1, 1982

"But there isn't much to find behind these snappy lines and readymade attitudes."
Like other Danziger ninth graders, Phoebe Brooks works out problems with her divorced parents and, on the side, acquires a boyfriend who's a "good kisser" and a caring person. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNITED TATES OF AMERICA by Paula Danziger
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"The author's scrapbook art may inspire readers to try crafting their own documentary pages. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Danziger (What a Trip, Amber Brown, 2001, etc.) breaks new ground with this amusing middle-school story illustrated in a novel way—with scrapbook art by the author done in the style of the sixth-grade narrator, Skate Tate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOT FOR A BILLION GAZILLION DOLLARS by Paula Danziger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Danziger's sure touch with dialogue, pixie humor, and unobtrusive ability to tuck in moral messages nicely complement the warm portrait of Matthew's parents and their relationship with their children. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Matthew Martin, 11, last met in Make Like a Tree and Leave (1990), faces reality when his parents decree that he must earn half the money to buy the expensive computer program he craves. Read full book review >