Search Results: "Daphne du Maurier"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 1993

"Biography of the most exemplary kind, and, in its own way, as haunting an evocation of a troubled woman as Rebecca itself. (Thirty-three b&w photographs)"
One of those rare biographies of popular icons—in this case, the author of Rebecca—that puts truth-telling ahead of mudslinging or whitewashing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAPHNE DU MAURIER: HAUNTED HEIRESS by Nina Auerbach
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"A valiant but unconvincing effort to resuscitate du Maurier to literary respectability."
Last night I dreamed of . . . a Daphne du Maurier whose works were "startlingly brilliant," peopled with "most unsavory" men and "defective" women, and whose exegesis here is shrouded in literary fog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAPHNE DU MAURIER AND HER SISTERS by Jane Dunn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"In this sensitive group portrait, Dunn (Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens, 2004, etc.) depicts three women struggling to escape Neverland, define for themselves both success and happiness, and hone their own identities."
Love and rivalry among three talented sisters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PRIVATE WORLD OF DAPHNE DU MAURIER by Martyn Shallcross
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1992

"Frustratingly slim pickings, even for devoted fans. (Illustrations—not seen.)"
A bare-bones biography of the popular British author of Rebecca, etc. Born in 1907, du Maurier, Shallcross tells us, was educated at home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DU MAURIERS by Daphne du Maurier
Released: April 23, 1937

"Sell to everyone who liked Gerald; and then turn about and sell Gerald to everyone who likes this."
Gerald starts with the marriage of "Kicky" (George) du Maurier. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 15, 1971

"Without a doubt all within its shadow."
With Daphne du Maurier you always know where you're at, or do you, since all of these five, long stories deal with supernal manifestations of one kind or another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SCAPEGOAT by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Feb. 20, 1956

"A sure best seller."
In her role as a spinner of tales, Daphne du Maurier has few equals, and this, which in any other hands would be a fantastically unbelievable yarn, holds the spellbound reader with a mounting conviction that so it might have been. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY COUSIN RACHEL by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Feb. 11, 1951

"A gifted craftsman and spinner of yarns, Daphne du Maurier excells herself."
This comes closer to Rebecca than anything Miss du Maurier has done and is, I think, one of her best novels, ingeniously contrived as to plot, successfully realized as to characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VANISHING CORNWALL by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Aug. 18, 1967

Cornwall, England...with its legends of Arthur and Tristan, its intimations of Crete, its history and tales, its trades and peoples...its perpetual spring...a likely subject for Miss du Maurier's romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLIGHT OF THE FALCON by Daphne du Maurier
Released: April 26, 1965

"However, if Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt can crest the bestseller lists with their weaker offerings, Daphne's dilly should make it with exactly the same audience increased by those hopefuls who remember Rebecca."
Daphne du Maurier is an excellent storyteller and can set in motion the most wornout mechanisms of melodrama in a way that doesn't irritate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1953

"These for sampling a collection that carries a name value."
A collection of eight stories, one of which is virtually a short novel and six of which appeared in England under the title, The Apple Tree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRENCHMAN'S CREEK by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Feb. 2, 1942

"Mad adventure, not always convincing as to details (or, in retrospect, as to pattern), but excellent escape reading in days when sheer story telling provides a way out as relief from daily headlines."
Better late than never — sorry! Read full book review >