Search Results: "Darwyn Cooke"


BOOK REVIEW

RICHARD STARK’S PARKER THE HUNTER by Darwyn Cooke
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 22, 2009

"Fans of the noirest noir, such as Frank Miller's Sin City series, will find a lot to like in this well-executed adaptation."
Graphic-novel version of dark 1950s crime fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HER BRILLIANT CAREER by Rachel Cooke
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 2, 2014

"Cooke's history of these uncelebrated heroines admirably fills in the gaps in the continuing story of women's role in the workplace."
British journalist Cooke recounts the stories of 10 women whose personal and professional lives shattered the common image of a repressed 1950s homemaker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAYATI, MY LIFE by Miriam Cooke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"The Palestinians deserve a larger fictional presence, but this agenda-driven tale, unfolded by paper-thin narrators and ranging over a period of more than six decades, is too eager to detail the horrors the principals suffer to do justice to a complex issue."
From a professor of Arabic literature, an elegantly written but programmatic debut novel attempts to illuminate the plight of the Palestinians in a tale of three generations of women caught in the crossfires of history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LITTLE BOOK OF SLOTH by Lucy Cooke
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 5, 2013

"While Cooke's intentions are commendable, the main message she unintentionally conveys is that too much cuteness can be cloying—and counterproductive. (Informational picture book. 6-8)"
Children might enjoy the myriad pictures of cute critters in this photo essay set at the Aviarios del Caribe sloth sanctuary, but it's not likely they'll sit still long enough to listen to the text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMOR AND PSYCHO by Carolyn Cooke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2013

"Cooke writes with passion, empathy and considerable humor as her characters face life-changing issues of divorce, illness, self-destruction and impending death."
Erotic, whimsical, profound—almost all of Cooke's stories illustrate what Matthew Arnold terms "the eternal note of sadness." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2009

"Skillful, unsettling arguments that the world is headed toward nuclear disaster from two different directions."
Diligent history of nuclear proliferation and peaceful nuclear energy makes a good case that they are intimately connected and equally out of control. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELODY by Dan Cooke
Released: Dec. 5, 2008

"More entertaining than cathartic, but a hair-raising read to be sure."
Darkness has descended on Breight, N.J. Accidental fatalities in the surrounding county hover at abnormally high rates until the mysterious 1974 death of a local eight-year-old ushers in a two-decade lull in the mortality rate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER by Elizabeth Cooke

"An earnest artistic exposé that gives an old topic new life."
Novelist Cooke (Still Life, 2016, etc.) explores the relationships of six famous male painters and their lovers, and the art that their passions and partings inspired.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Cooke itemizes the available details, but more importantly, she notes the questions that weren't asked, the facts that were not introduced, and the logical conclusions that never arrived."
Novelist Cooke applies her considerable storytelling talent to expose the incompetent, ineffective investigation and 1781 trial of John Donellan in England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL EATER by Bill Cooke
Released: Oct. 29, 2014

"Reads like an introduction to something bigger; fans partial to epic apocalyptic thrillers should keep an eye out."
In Cooke's debut thriller, copycat murders that seem to be emulating the work of a serial killer culminate in lethal riots in the Texas Hill Country, leading the few survivors no choice but to fend for themselves. Read full book review >