Search Results: "Dava Sobel"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"A liquid entertainment of choice passages on the thoughts and deeds of Copernicus."
Sobel (The Planets, 2005, etc.) offers another meaty-while-mellifluous story of science. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PLANETS by Dava Sobel
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 11, 2005

"Thoroughly readable: not a dry recitation of facts—though the facts are there—but a lively exploration of the historical and cultural meaning of the planets. "
A brief tour of the solar system, with liberal dollops of scientific history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A welcome and engaging work that does honor to Sobel's subjects."
Popular science writer Sobel (And the Sun Stood Still, 2016, etc.) continues her project of heralding the many contributions of women to science. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 19, 1995

"Breezily written and full of fascinating characters and facts, here's a science book as enjoyable as any novel."
The subtitle here tells the reader exactly what the book is about; what it doesn't say is how much fun it is to read. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 21, 1999

"Alas, his letters to her are lost. (First printing of 75,000)"
Sobel, author of the bestselling Longitude (1995), has elegantly translated the letters Galileo's eldest child, Virginia, wrote to him and uses them as a leitmotif to illuminate their deep mutual love, religious faith, and dedication to science. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LETTERS TO FATHER by Maria Celeste Galilei
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 16, 2001

"Lively and lovely. Making these available to the English-speaking world is a great public service."
The gentle, intelligent voice of Galileo's daughter speaks across the centuries in 124 remarkable epistles—published for the first time in English—written to her father in the early 17th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 2, 1992

"I suspect that immortality may be quite common among extraterrestrials'') and a sense of cosmic awe. (Line art and photographs—not seen.)"
The answer is ``yes,'' says Drake (Astronomy/UC at Santa Cruz), founder of the modern search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), in this likable autobiography told with the assistance of Sobel, former science editor for The New York Times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF DILLON, READ by Robert Sobel
NON-FICTION
Released: May 28, 1991

"A dreary, frequently fawning recitation of interest mainly to members of the principals' immediate families or their close friends."
Investment reputations, runs a Wall Street saw, are like virginity: They can be preserved but not restored. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 21, 1993

"Many may disagree, but the facts of high finance in the 1980's remain fascinating, even in the author's less-than-neutral hands."
Informative—if often apologetic and even fawning—attempt by Sobel (Business/Hofstra University; The Life and Times of Dillon, Read, 1991, etc.) to put into ``historical perspective'' the Wall Street shenanigans of Michael Milken. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"An engaged and engaging examination of 'what current science allows us to say (or does not) about Sandy's relation to human-induced climate change.'"
Sobel (Environmental Sciences and Applied Physics and Mathematics/Columbia Univ.) grapples with the "complex questions involving science, engineering, politics, and human psychology" that arose in Hurricane Sandy's wake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLOR BLIND by Sheila Sobel
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"Chaotic characters, a disjointed plot, and a romance that falls flat. (Mystery. 12-16)"
Seventeen-year-old April's relocation to her aunt's house in New Orleans following her father's unexpected death introduces her to new love, old secrets, and black magic. Read full book review >